Why does music have such a big effect on us? The reddit explanation of recognizing patterns doesn't make any sense.

Why does music have such a big effect on us? The reddit explanation of recognizing patterns doesn't make any sense. Why don't we get enjoyment from other thousands of other noises which are patterns like a car engine or just talking? How can the strum of a string make all your worries go away? How can it make seem like life is worth living? How can a strum of a string be so powerful? I can't think of any evolutionary benefit.

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  1. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Why don't we get enjoyment from other thousands of other noises which are patterns like a car engine or just talking?
    anon, I...

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      what?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        There are definitely people who enjoy their v8 engine or the sweet drone of a hercules air transport anon. All sounds have the potential to scratch your balls.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          You are a woman I can tell

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Music is as direct an objectification and copy of the whole will as the world itself, nay, even as the Ideas, whose multiplied manifestation constitutes the world of individual things. Music is thus by no means like the other arts, the copy of the Ideas, but the copy of the will itself, whose objectivity the Ideas are. This is why the effect of music is so much more powerful and penetrating than that of the other arts, for they speak only of shadows, but it speaks of the thing itself.

    >Schopenhauer,The World as Will and Representation

    Tldr. arts like painting are copies of sensory impressions, but music is a pattern in-itself, not a copy of anything, therefore it hits harder.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >arts like painting are copies of sensory impressions
      They can be, they dont have to be. You can create an image without ever first observing it in the same way you compose music.
      Man every time I hear from Schopenhauer I wonder how anyone thought him smart.

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        You’re not the first person to have this critique. Ever heard the word “Ars gratia artis”?

        Anyway you would have liked Debussy, the man.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          >Ars gratia artis
          Not exactly what I mean. Unless I misunderstood the first quote, music was being held above other arts because of its primacy, its directness. That music doesnt need
          >oh I saw something nice, let me copy it
          But rather creates the "something nice" as itself - the vibrational sequence is not pointing to anything else.
          My contention is this is also possible with visual/light/EM vibrations. That you can create a primal connection to the idea of vision without having to point to "something nice", and be the "something nice" itself.
          You can likely do this with any vibration - engaging the skin in certain sequences, for instance - or likely with any sensory information.
          Certainly the art in cooking is the primal taste of it, and does not need to point to anything else (though it can through engagement of memory and arrangement).

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Why does music have such a big effect on us?
    It touches your soul and connects you the divine... simple as.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    According to Pythagoras it's because of the unique interactions of the sound waves. Pleasant sounds have simple mathematical relationships to each other so the interference pattern given off when they collide is somehow soothing or interesting to us. In a more abstract way Schopenhauer says music is a language that connects one will to another will and allows them to communicate directly. I like both and think they're both insightful

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Did he give the formula

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        I’m not that anon but another seeker with an interest in music.
        Pythagoras’ actual writings on music are unfortunately lost. We can get *fairly* close with Boethius’ On Music but it’s still more than 500 years later and by his time some things had fallen out of practice. Like all music was written in only one of the three genii of harmony and it’s still (mostly) that way today. However Boethius does give us the math behind how to derive a Pythagorean period (what we call a semitone in music today) and also the idealized ratios for consonant intervals.

        Al-Farabi had an interesting theory of how string instruments specifically affect us. His mechanism was that on 4 string instruments (most of the European and Arabic ones. Even guitars started with 4 strings and had the two lowest strings added later) each of the strings is keyed to one of our humors, so basically a musician can adjust our humoral balance in real time just by adjusting which strings he uses.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          Something “paranormal” about music that I’ve always liked is how Plato and Aristotle treat music.

          Plato was weirdly autistic about wind instruments. He hated them and said in the Republic that they would be banned from the ideal city. Aristotle went a bit further and offered the origin story that string instruments ultimately descend from Apollo’s lyre whereas the first wind instrument was made by Athena to imitate the hunting cry of the gorgons which paralyzed their prey. Essentially: string instruments are allied to life and wind instruments to death.

          But what gets interesting about that is how the modern Catholic Church treats music. The Catholic Church is traceable at least in part to Apollo worship, but in terms of music for services string music is verboten. Playing a guitar at a Catholic mass is seen as blasphemous by some people. In the enlightenment era the same players would use both harpsichords (keyboarded string instruments) on secular contexts and organs (keyboarded wind instruments) in sacred contexts. Why do we use wind to worship the Catholic god when Aristotle basically called them wild magic?

          >pic is my horse

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >Playing a guitar at a Catholic mass is seen as blasphemous by some people.
            https://youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k4nVqHO0kRA1K5JR2RbubK8LhlnxRDyLg&playnext=1&index=1

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            >some people
            They started doing it after Vatican II, it was actually strictly forbidden before that and people who lived before the changes still get weirded out by it. If you spend time around tradcaths you’ll hear them bring it up as one of their main complaints about Vatican II pretty quickly.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            You have vocal cords capable of making a wide variety of tones and ears to hear them.
            Hearing, sight, taste, smell, and touch are the foundational pillars of language, which is the foundation of logic, reason, and art.
            Language is the greatest evolutionary benefit humans have. That is your answer OP, in case this isn't entirely a bait post.

            >Playing a guitar at a Catholic mass is seen as blasphemous by some people.
            https://youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_k4nVqHO0kRA1K5JR2RbubK8LhlnxRDyLg&playnext=1&index=1

            https://i.imgur.com/I07ZCh2.jpg

            Something “paranormal” about music that I’ve always liked is how Plato and Aristotle treat music.

            Plato was weirdly autistic about wind instruments. He hated them and said in the Republic that they would be banned from the ideal city. Aristotle went a bit further and offered the origin story that string instruments ultimately descend from Apollo’s lyre whereas the first wind instrument was made by Athena to imitate the hunting cry of the gorgons which paralyzed their prey. Essentially: string instruments are allied to life and wind instruments to death.

            But what gets interesting about that is how the modern Catholic Church treats music. The Catholic Church is traceable at least in part to Apollo worship, but in terms of music for services string music is verboten. Playing a guitar at a Catholic mass is seen as blasphemous by some people. In the enlightenment era the same players would use both harpsichords (keyboarded string instruments) on secular contexts and organs (keyboarded wind instruments) in sacred contexts. Why do we use wind to worship the Catholic god when Aristotle basically called them wild magic?

            >pic is my horse

            >you got an organ going, no wonder the sound has so much body!

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            String and key instruments are allied with death in the sense that they represent a bureacratic model of reality that murders the organic in favor of the machine. Nonetheless: good to see you're passionate about such an art form.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Before your eyes were formed in the womb, your developing body and mind were subject to the sounds of your environment. Music is sound set to order and patterns by intelligence. The human mind by default detects and captures informational patterns as reference points for experiences which may be good, bad, or other.

    Music predates humanity, and was given to man by the gods. In the Greek pantheon, Hermes created the lyre. In antediluvian times, man had the lyre (harp), organs (flute), and drums. Music was a part of worship, rhythmic sound was used in work, and people played for fun, as they do now.

    Everyone with ears that can hear, hears music, and most people enjoy it to a greater or lesser degree. It is a type of common denominator for communication. For those that can create music, it can be a means of personal expression. For those that understand communication, music is a powerful tool for it's ability to influence the human mind.

    >tl;dr you can't touch music but it can touch you

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Musica_universalis

  7. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Why don't we get enjoyment from other thousands of other noises which are patterns like a car engine or just talking?
    We do.

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Ask yourself why would we get enjoyment from hearing other noises ?
    It's the basis of the voice that tenors with your brain, gives the feeling of intimacy

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Music is primal in nature, it gets us closer to each other and to the non-rigid world filled with unknown, as well as with the monkey self that we try hard as frick to convince ourselves that we've civilized and thus erased.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    resonant frequencies. If things are in resonance they energize each other.

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    it's the Tao. music comes from harmony of opposites

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    harmonic resonations, in music they are artform, in engineering they are often desingn fail

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Cymatics

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I sometimes laugh at my own farts

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    >Why don't we get enjoyment from other thousands of other noises which are patterns like a car engine or just talking?
    Speak for yourself. I prefer the ambience of the sounds outside my window than whatever shit passes for music in these days. Even older music is garbage.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Are you autistic by chance?

  16. 2 months ago
    Anon musk

    Our life is like a poem, or rather poem reflects life, poem is the expression of life
    Music is a form of poem

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    What IS vibration and energy movement, anyway?

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