Thinking about getting baptized, what are the?

Thinking about getting baptized, what are the /x/ implications of doing this? I don't think I am part of any specific denominations I just go to my local church.

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    What kind of church do you go to. Stay away from Pentecostals anon

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I'm not OP but I am curious, what's with the Pentecostals?
      My mother became once again a repentant before succumbing to cancer (born repentant, became an Orthodox in marriage, rejoined repentants) .
      (also, me, personally, I don't associate myself with any. Born Orthodox, but seeing many people being greedy and only at the end of their lives, being a bit kind, grinds my gears.)

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Generally speaking Pentecostalism is very charismatic. That means they emphasize overt displays of emotion and spiritual gifts such a speaking in tongues/“drunkenness with the Holy Spirit.” Snake handlers is one stereotypical display commonly associated with Pentecostals.
        They also typically fall under the “holiness” umbrella, which means that they believe that it is possible to live a completely sinless life through their faith. This specifically is the sticking point for many.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I am a bit confused about the speaking in tongues/"drunkenness with the Holy Spirit" part. What's their view on it, and how do they act on this?
          Drunkenness with the Holy Spirit sounds like something that would be used as a way to encourage drunkenness in general.
          By "Snake handlers", I assume that the stereotype means that they aren't to be trusted OR they "handle" stuff with individuals that are not to be trusted?
          Also, it's a shame htat their belief of living a sinless life through faith can make the other confessions (Catholic, Orthodox for example) resent them. But maybe that's from my experience of seeing how other people treat others, and that's it.
          What do you make of it Anon? Do you believe their path is possible? I'm only curious since I don't want to join them.

          But if I would choose a confession, it would be Catholic at this point.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I am a bit confused about the speaking in tongues/"drunkenness with the Holy Spirit" part. What's their view on it, and how do they act on this?
            I’m not an expert, but it’s just one of the ways that they experience God on a personal level. Drunkenness with the spirit is basically a kind of ecstatic trance, speaking in tongues is as well. During a service, while worshiping, or with music, they get whipped up in a frenzy and they claim that the Holy Spirit is causing these reactions. In one sense it’s a way for them to confirm their faith.
            >By "Snake handlers", I assume that the stereotype means that they aren't to be trusted OR they "handle" stuff with individuals that are not to be trusted?
            Neither, it is literally handling live snakes. They hold dangerous snakes and do things with them, trusting that the Lord will protect them from being bitten.

            As for the holiness movement, I disagree with the concept. There was only one man who lived a sinless life: Jesus. I believe that we have an inherently sinful nature, but by the grace of the Lord and the sacrifice of His Son, we are made righteous. Still, the law of sin lives in the flesh:
            >Romans 7:21 - 25
            >I find then a law, that evil is present with me, the one who wills to do good. For I delight in the law of God according to the inward man. But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members. I wretched man that I am! Who will deliver me from this body of death? I thank God—through Jesus Christ our Lord!
            >So then, with the mind I myself serve the law of God, but with the flesh the law of sin.

            As for the spectacle of the charismatics, I’m not willing to discredit all miraculous phenomena. However, I question how much of it is not simply induced by psychological/emotional means.

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >the /x/ implications
    OK buckle up.

    Baptism is a ritual. One of the purposes of ritual is to open a connection between the person and the esoteric concept or force or entity in question. So you may find that it does deepen your connection to Jesus. Particularly if the person carrying out the baptism understands the esoteric nature of the work and/or is part of a strong lineage. Lineage carries power, like a well-worn path is wider and can carry more traffic. So for example the rituals and practises of the Catholic church and the Church of England can carry a strong blessing. Even if their priests have historically been a bit dodgy. And even if their history with regards to all manner of twisted doctrine and social evil has been appalling.

    So that brings us on to the first downside. The channel by which you will receive the blessing is not clean. It has history. And in accepting something through that system or church you are opening yourself to the energy of that history. If you have a good heart and a disciplined nature you may not have any problems with this. But imagine for a moment, you have some prediliction, something you might not even be conscious of. And it might be something you might not ever have become aware of. Maybe a little pedo, a little bi, an unintegrated part of your ego that thinks it now has justification to be superior, etc. All the shadow aspects of 2000 years of the church.

    continued.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Then there is the potential effects on your brain and mind from only the 'good' aspects of the process. If you find that you suddenly have an influx of light or power, it can be very destabilising. It can power up your higher centres, your heart, throat, mind, and 'crown'. Which can lead to ungrounded states of mind, and fallacious reasoning being applied to the experience. Lots of christgays just become flakey jerks because they have basically fried their brain and aren't able to generate rational thought in the overwhelm of christed energy.

      So you will need to consider how you will manage the outcome if it goes that way. Are you OK with potentially becoming evangelical, ungrounded, irrational? Or are you already grounded enough to know that having christ or god in your life doesn't necessarily mean that you become a religious nutter.

      continued.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        For an adult it's a very public way of joining a particular club. Along with the downsides I've mentioned already you would then be expected to conform to the group's expectations and habits. This could limit your own growth as you find the comfortable aspects of community and church always come with judgement for anyone who tries to operate outside of their preferences. So at some point you want to deepen your practise, and start a christian meditation study group, or a healing group. Will your church allow it?

        But you might want this public acknowledgement of your faith and your place in the congregation. Just be aware of the potential pitfalls. If you did want to avoid the public aspect of it, do you know and trust a priest to carry out a private ceremony? You could discuss with them the meaning and the form of the work and craft a ritual which had a stronger meaning for you than the standard form of words, for example.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >is the potential effects on your bra
          From my understanding baptism should be a public acknowledgement of faith, I don't plan on it being a private ceremony

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        the latter, but I think I can see myself becoming a lesser version of the former but not to the point of craziness.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    OP, please disregard all these other posts.
    Baptism is not a magical act. There is nothing supernatural or esoteric about the water. Baptism as a rite is simply a symbolic and public declaration of faith in Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior.
    Lord willing, He will have mercy on you and baptize you in the Holy Spirit: literal baptism is an outward sign, but it is the Holy Spirit at work in your life that is truly “magical.” This is not an esoteric power that you can influence or control, as these other anons seem to suggest. Nor is it something that submits itself to the kinds of esoteric/occult systems that they also describe.
    Christ is Lord. We are provided union with Christ in the Holy Spirit. With Christ we are brought to the Father, but who can come to the Son who was not first drawn by the Father?
    If you belong to a church, and you’re serious about taking up the cross, then take these questions to your pastor. Don’t ask here.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      thanks, I think this is the best answer

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Praise be to the Lord. I will be praying for you.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        If you understand the things I wrote in my three posts you should be able to see why this other anon's answer is not the best one. It's naive, and uneducated. The simplistic, evangelical types have a default setting which is 'esoteric is evil', which is nonsense. Esoterics exist. You came to x/ because you are aware of that and you asked about the implications.

        By any definition of magic, Baptism is indeed a magical act. You are entering into a ritual led by an intiate with a pre-existing connection to a hidden (literal meaning of 'esoteric') power you want to contact and invoke. That is, open your mind and energetic body to and invite in.

        If you do this with the naive expectation that it will all be lovely just because Jesus loves you (he does) then you risk the scenarios I've described above. Just use your intelligence and your discernment to be clear about what you're entering into, and what the context, i.e. church, is. I saw a meme a while ago which is a bit twee but it goes, god wants spiritual fruits, not religious nuts. Be careful, and don't give up your intelligence and your self-determination for anyone.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Your esoteric mumbo-jumbo has absolutely nothing to do with Christianity.
          >hurr muh complexity!
          There's more sophistication in orthodox Christian theology than all the occult drivel on the planet.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            If you think that what I wrote is 'mumbo jumbo' then you're just showing your own ignorance. You could criticise any point of it if you understood any of it, but instead you just tried for a blanket putdown. Not really good enough. You're on /x/ - Paranormal, there's a clue in the name.

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Stay away from baptists and Presbyterians.

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Not that anon, but why? As someone who's only really started to be drawn into Christianity recently after leaving Buddhism, I'm still researching the difference between the churches and prot denominations.

      The only thing I know at this stage is (and I believe this applies to the Presbyterians) that I want to avoid any denomination tainted by Calvinist predetermination.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Following Jesus means rejecting all 'denominations' and sects. They are the Pharisees of today.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Not helpful. Elaborate or I can only assume that you're one of the many /x/ pseudo-gnostic larpers.

          I see no point in the "no WE are the TRUE church! source: me" argument between orthos, caths and prots. I just want to find a church that's closest to the original teachings.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >"no WE are the TRUE church! source: me"
            That's exactly what I am trying to warn you about. No church accurately represents the teachings of Jesus. Stay well away from them all.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I don't expect them to represent the original teachings 100%. It's been over 2000 years, this is to be expected. The search is my own, and a modern day church may play a part in it, but it won't be the entirety of it. Saying "all churches bad" seems to throw the baby out with the bathwater.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            It's all in the Sermon on the Mount. The rest is institutional cruft.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Stay well away from them all.
            I disagree. See Hebrews 10:

            >Hebrews 10:24 - 25
            >And let us consider one another in order to stir up love and good works, not forsaking the assembling of ourselves together, as is the manner of some, but exhorting one another, and so much the more as you see the Day approaching.

            Church is imperative for the believer. We are commanded to worship and praise the Lord together.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Okay, who wrote Hebrews? kek

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Matthew 16:23
            >Jesus turned and said to Peter, “Get behind me, Satan! You are a stumbling block to me; you do not have in mind the concerns of God, but merely human concerns.”

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes, yes, very based. I'm sure you looked it up and found out that no one knows who wrote it. Strange how the Church put it in there then, wonder why...

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Exactly. The Church is the stumbling stone (Peter), the work of Satan.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            what do you mean? some fat old italian man and his gaggle of homosexuals in red dresses don't speak for God?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Yes they do. Repent.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'll repent after they tell me to stop loaning at interest, but we both know they won't because they're flip flopping liars and scoundrels lel

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >There is a common misconception in the modern world that the Catholic Church no longer considers usury a sin. Partly this is due to the modern definition of usury, which sees it as charging a high or unjust amount of interest — a rather ambiguous definition. However, this is not how the Church defines usury.
            >Modern Catholic teaching has not swayed in its understanding of usury. The Compendium of the Social Doctrine of the Church makes it clear: “Although the quest for equitable profit is acceptable in economic and financial activity, recourse to usury is to be morally condemned.” It also cites Pope St. John Paul II, who speaks of usury as “a scourge that is also a reality in our time and that has a stranglehold on many peoples’ lives.”
            Gonna repent now?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'll pull a little old Catholic stunt and say that it wasn't declared "ex cathedra" ergo I don't have to follow it.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I'll pull a little old Catholic stunt and say that it wasn't declared "ex cathedra" ergo I don't have to follow it.

            Also, I was baptized in the Russian Orthodox Church, so leave me alone or you're going to go to Hell.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            That is out of context as are many stupid headlines about Pope Francis. He said that it's a "very grave sin against ecumenism." But being ecumenical isn't necessary to be a Catholic. So stop with your counterfeit Christian Orthodoxy, you schismatic, and repent.

            I'll pull a little old Catholic stunt and say that it wasn't declared "ex cathedra" ergo I don't have to follow it.

            That's not true at all.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >counterfeit Christian Orthodoxy
            Vladimir the Great converted a thousand years ago, before even the great schism, there's nothing counterfeit about it LOL
            >That's not true at all.
            Okay, are you ready to embrace your transgender sisters in the Church?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            More misleading headlines. Francis trying to be nice to trannies doesn't mean being a troony is OK. It is clearly against Catholic teaching to be a troony.
            >Vladimir the Great
            How does he make you not a schismatic fraud?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            So this is what happens when you have a Jesuit for a pope.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            There'll be more sweet loving Popes like this in the future, don't worry!

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Forgot to add picture kek. It's Father Martin, a favorite of Pope Francis, blessing a gay couple after the Pope dropped some more papal bull

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous
          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I know, the Ecumenical Patriarchate is out of control.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous
          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I just want to find a church that's closest to the original teachings.
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ebionites

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I mean it couldn't hurt

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Read Paul, since I don't think protestants will explain what this is actually about:

    Or are you unaware that we—as many as were baptized into the Anointed One, Jesus—were baptized into his death?

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I got baptized in mtn dew and now my kda in csgo is in the .01 percentile
    Praise MLG

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