The Problem of Evil made me a Christian rather than a Buddhist.

The Problem of Evil made me a Christian rather than a Buddhist. Because if the Buddhists are right that suffering is optional, then there is no Problem of Evil, thus no reason to doubt the existence of an all-good God. By the same token, to the extent that there remains any reason to doubt the existence of an all-good God, Buddhism is limited.

POSIWID: The Purpose Of A System Is What It Does Shirt $21.68

Homeless People Are Sexy Shirt $21.68

POSIWID: The Purpose Of A System Is What It Does Shirt $21.68

  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    well relief from suffering in Buddhism requires an equivalent of gnosis which leads me to believe your God is the Demiurge Yaldabaoth. Without Yaldabaoth there would be no need for Buddhism. All life is suffering - this is still a problem of evil

    Allah essentially sent Buddha as a prophet to show he wasn't invested in making people suffer like Yaldabaoth

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Seethe

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Good point anon.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      More info about Allah sending Buddha?

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I know that there are monks who like to say that suffering is optional, but this is not a type of doctrine that I support and is, in my opinion, associated with Buddhism as Newage.
    To say that Buddhism, a religion that says suffering from the root (three noble truths), doesn't deal with the problem of evil doesn't make sense.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      If Buddhism totally deals with it, then it gets rid of any obstacles to believe in an all-good God.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        But if Buddhist practice deals with it and Christian practice does not, onpy the former is a true religion and the latter, mere theological drivel.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          If you learn to enjoy life, then you should give glory to God, who created the Buddha and your happiness.

          That doesn't follow. The Problem of Evil only exists for those who posit the existence of some separate omnipotent and omnibenevolent entity. Buddhism doesn't need to contend with that because it never makes the claim that such a deity exists.

          You misunderstand. I know that the Problem of Evil does not pose a problem for the non-theistic Buddhist worldview. But if a Buddhist can even UNDERSTAND or SYMPATHIZE with the Problem of Evil, then it’s admitting that suffering still exists.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Buddhism is limited.
      it has good pointers to realizations and aims to do nothing else

      all of buddhism says suffering is optional, what the frick are you talking about?

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    That doesn't follow. The Problem of Evil only exists for those who posit the existence of some separate omnipotent and omnibenevolent entity. Buddhism doesn't need to contend with that because it never makes the claim that such a deity exists.

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Where does Buddhism say that suffering is optional? Literally the first noble truth is that life is suffering.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Buddhism isn’t for those who want to know the universe’s creator. It is for those who want to escape the universe (this fricking containment field). I think Buddhists have different motivations than Christians as they seek to leave. I personally have seen that the Abrahamic God is in fact a demiurge and unfit for worship. Buddhists in majority Buddhist countries treat Buddhism in a way similar to Christianity. There is worship and prayers to the Buddha to help them, save them, purify them. I think it is from the demiurge’s influence that this way of life was turned into a loosh catching mechanism. The Buddha of our age, and the others that supposedly existed probably left this place and all the other joined servers a long, long time ago. Buddha is not to be worshiped but to be an example. It is best to prepare for the possibility that the demiurge wants to recycle your soul and gain existence through your worship of it in perpetuity. Prepare for a possibility of consciousness after death and think of ways to break out of this system. Christianity is not the way. I am honestly unsure if Buddhism can get you out of here or not.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      What r u tryna solve bro? Go write a thesis paper fricktard

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It is not 'optional' it is mandatory to overcome

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The problem of evil is a human abstraction borne of limited perspective. What is called evil and good are subjective views of actions that are, on the highest level, a sort of eternal seeking of "karmic" homeostasis in the universe. A medium for souls to use to increase/reduce dissonance with the creator.

  8. 1 month ago
    no, buddy

    Your reasoning doesn't make sense to me.

    The only problem with evil is thinking we can define it. Instead we can only outline evil as that which intentionally causes suffering. Suffering itself is not evil, and that which causes suffering (change) is intrinsic to life. Yet still, the removal of an individual's suffering does nothing to alleviate evil. Trying to make someone suffer is evil even if your target does not end up suffering as a result.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Buddhism deconditions, Abrahamics condition. Simple as

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *