Rabies. It's exceptionally common, but people just don't run into the animals that carry it often.

Rabies. It's exceptionally common, but people just don't run into the animals that carry it often. Skunks especially, and bats.
Let me paint you a picture.
You go camping, and at midday you decide to take a nap in a nice little hammock. While sleeping, a tiny brown bat, in the "rage" stages of infection is fidgeting in broad daylight, uncomfortable, and thirsty (due to the hydrophobia) and you snort, startling him. He goes into attack mode.
Except you're asleep, and he's a little brown bat, so weighs around 6 grams. You don't even feel him land on your bare knee, and he starts to bite. His teeth are tiny. Hardly enough to even break the skin, but he does manage to give you the equivalent of a tiny scrape that goes completely unnoticed.
Rabies does not travel in your blood. In fact, a blood test won't even tell you if you've got it. (Antibody tests may be done, but are useless if you've ever been vaccinated.)
You wake up, none the wiser. If you notice anything at the bite site at all, you assume you just lightly scraped it on something.
The bomb has been lit, and your nervous system is the wick. The rabies will multiply along your nervous system, doing virtually no damage, and completely undetectable. You literally have NO symptoms.
It may be four days, it may be a year, but the camping trip is most likely long forgotten. Then one day your back starts to ache... Or maybe you get a slight headache?
At this point, you're already dead. There is no cure.
(The sole caveat to this is the Milwaukee Protocol, which leaves most patients dead anyway, and the survivors mentally disabled, and is seldom done).
There's no treatment. It has a 100% kill rate.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Only rabies. And once you're symptomatic, it's over. You're dead.
    So what does that look like?
    Your headache turns into a fever, and a general feeling of being unwell. You're fidgety. Uncomfortable. And scared. As the virus that has taken its time getting into your brain finds a vast network of nerve endings, it begins to rapidly reproduce, starting at the base of your brain... Where your "pons" is located. This is the part of the brain that controls communication between the rest of the brain and body, as well as sleep cycles.
    Next you become anxious. You still think you have only a mild fever, but suddenly you find yourself becoming scared, even horrified, and it doesn't occur to you that you don't know why. This is because the rabies is chewing up your amygdala.
    As your cerebellum becomes hot with the virus, you begin to lose muscle coordination, and balance. You think maybe it's a good idea to go to the doctor now, but assuming a doctor is smart enough to even run the tests necessary in the few days you have left on the planet, odds are they'll only be able to tell your loved ones what you died of later.
    You're twitchy, shaking, and scared. You have the normal fear of not knowing what's going on, but with the virus really fricking the amygdala this is amplified a hundred fold. It's around this time the hydrophobia starts.
    You're horribly thirsty, you just want water. But you can't drink. Every time you do, your throat clamps shut and you vomit. This has become a legitimate, active fear of water. You're thirsty, but looking at a glass of water begins to make you gag, and shy back in fear. The contradiction is hard for your hot brain to see at this point. By now, the doctors will have to put you on IVs to keep you hydrated, but even that's futile. You were dead the second you had a headache.
    You begin hearing things, or not hearing at all as your thalamus goes

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    You taste sounds, you see smells, everything starts feeling like the most horrifying acid trip anyone has ever been on. With your hippocampus long under attack, you're having trouble remembering things, especially family.
    You're alone, hallucinating, thirsty, confused, and absolutely, undeniably terrified. Everything scares the literal shit out of you at this point. These strange people in lab coats. These strange people standing around your bed crying, who keep trying to get you "drink something" and crying. And it's only been about a week since that little headache that you've completely forgotten. Time means nothing to you anymore. Funny enough, you now know how the bat felt when he bit you.
    Eventually, you slip into the "dumb rabies" phase. Your brain has started the process of shutting down. Too much of it has been turned to liquid virus. Your face droops. You drool. You're all but unaware of what's around you. A sudden noise or light might startle you, but for the most part, it's all you can do to just stare at the ground. You haven't really slept for about 72 hours.
    Then you die. Always, you die.
    And there's not one... fricking... thing... anyone can do for you.
    Then there's the question of what to do with your corpse. I mean, sure, burying it is the right thing to do. But the fricking virus can survive in a corpse for years. You could kill every rabid animal on the planet today, and if two years from now, some moist, preserved, rotten hunk of used-to-be brain gets eaten by an animal, it starts all over.
    So yeah, rabies scares the shit out of me. And it's fricking EVERYWHERE. (Source: Spent a lot of time working with rabies. Would still get my vaccinations if I could afford them.)

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      ive had a couple potential run ins with rabies and had 2x of the 5 shot course of post exposure vaccines. its definitely a bit of headfrick because the damn virus can be in you for years before it even does anything.

      how did you work around rabies?

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >But the fricking virus can survive in a corpse for years
      im not sure thats correct though. i think it can last a few weeks if the body freezes and stays frozen, but in general the virus is quite weak when it comes to surviving in or outside of a host.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The virus dies in animal saliva within an hour of being in the open air. I doubt it survives very long in corpses.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Rabies is just fear propaganda from the government so we become disconnected from nature

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      This. The White man doesn't fear. He knows the world is a dangerous place. But that's just the way it is.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Rabies isn’t common, skunks are most common carriers, you are a moron.

        Rabies upon the both of you dipshits

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Story about the only unvaccinated survivor of rabbies ever recorded

    https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/jeanna-giese-rabies-survivor/

    1955 short film describing rabies in a human patient

    ?si=8mAhvxGGVv0BIkpH

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Rabies isn’t common, skunks are most common carriers, you are a moron.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      im over on the NB/ME border area and round here the main carrier are raccoons. every year they fly all up and down the border dropping edible vaccine snacks from light aircraft. its not a big problem here and i think they only get a couple positive specimens every year. they take it pretty seriously though which is nice.

      if you suspect a rabid animal they will send out someone to pick it up or kill it for you, then send the heads away for testing. happens very quickly and efficiently.

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    "what if a really specific and unlikely set of circumstances occurred. wouldnt that be crazy"

    yeah thatd be pretty fricked up man. not paranormal though

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Rabies is caused by a parasite. Stop calling it a virus.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >Rabies is caused by a parasite. Stop calling it a virus.
      You need to contact the CDC and tell them they got it all wrong;

      https://www.cdc.gov/rabies/index.html

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        The CDC is a propaganda machine. If you don't understand that yet, then you never will. If you do understand it and continue to lie then you're apart of the problem.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Prion disease is a scourge for sure

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Tell me exactly why I should read fan fiction about dying of rabies.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      i mean, it can and has happened that people got rabies in similar circumstances, but its usually people who work around bats or go into those massive and disgusting shit-filled flying rat colonies and get some rabid bat drool in their eyes and mouth. it takes quite a bit really because even if you are directly exposed to small amounts the percentage of times infection occurs is actually very small.

      the most common way to get rabies is from kittens and puppies, and the majority of cases are young children; they get a little scratch or nip from the animal, dont tell anyone because it was nothing, then winf up dying from rabies a few weeks.months later. most of the worlds cases are in India.

    • 1 month ago
      synopticon

      There's a chapter around the middle, comes out of nowhere, detailing reasons for exposing extremely young "subjects" to certain kinds of "media"
      Struck me as some really shady "Strange Days" shit, and I know this author gets a lot of his story beats second-hand through his psycho fanboys

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Not gonna manifest this, sorry.

      You shouldn't.

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There are toons of bat atacs in the Us.

    But most people get vaccinated when atacs occur

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I didnt get the post attack vaccine, i have rabies, im gonna die sometime soon. Ive made my peace.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Honestly op scared me,im gonna hang myself now, no way in hell am i gonna go trough that

  12. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Why did you post this to /x/ you fear mongering homosexual?

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Spooky

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Yeah the scary thing about rabies is that it has no cure. You either are vaccinated, or you're fricked if you get it.

    The water thing is interesting. It's theorized to be an evolved way of the virus spreading. Scared of water + excess rabies drool = rabies drool gets everywhere, infecting others. It makes you scared of water so you drool more and can't flush out the drool and rabies foam.

    It also makes you have an innate response to clamp down on anything that comes inside your mouth, which is why rabid animals attack in the first place. Even conscious humans will involuntarily clamp down on things like the fingers of doctors, so they have to be extra cautious.

    It's basically the closest thing we have to a zombie virus irl. Thankfully the fatality rate of it stops it from becoming a pandemic; it kills those it infects faster than it can spread. That, plus the rabies animal vaccine programs that drop food into forests, has helped to massively cut it back in the years.

    Make sure you're up to date on your Vaxxes if you're ever fricking around innawood. Forget rabies, tetanus alone will frick you up.

    God is a sick frick and he made some really nasty diseases. Rabies is proof that God can't be benevolent.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Honestly, Im astounded humanity lived this long considering half the fricking things g-d put on this planet can kill us in minutes.

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's a disorienting illness that causes animals to behave oddly. It's not the fricking virus from 28 Days Later. Just don't poke sick animals and you'll be fine.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    "Rabies virus"
    Viruses aren't real
    They're mini parasites
    So you can totally kill rabies before it kills you. Garlic, Oregono oil, Ivermectin, vitamin c, anything else parasites hate

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I have a book called Rabid: A Cultural History of the World's Most Diabolical Virus by Bill Wasik and Monica Murphy. Haven't gotten around to reading it quite yet but it looks really good.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      sounds fun. i fricking hate rabies. had to deal with potential exposures too many fricking times, and often in remote parts of far away countries, and then at my own house in the woods here. FRICK OFF RABIES you c**t.

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