I've gotta get this off my chest?

I've gotta get this off my chest, /x/. For me, the idea of reincarnation is simply incorrect. I can understand the concept of energy being recycled throughout eternity, but without my memories whatever I returned as would not be me. If I lost all my memories and interpretations, I would not be myself. I don't enjoy saying this; but the whole concept sounds... Dumb.

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  1. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's the wishful thinking of the ego not wishing to ever cease to exist, and most people can't let go of theirs. You're right

  2. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    There are different views reincarnation. They are not all the same. For example, the various Hindu religions hold the soul (atman) is eternal and undergoes a cycle of birth, death, and reincarnation till realizes its role given the Vedas or Brahman given the tradition. These traditions hold that there is some controller of karma and the process often a specific personal God even if ultimately it is not a personal God.

    Buddhism states that the concept of anatta, or non-self, where what is reborn is not a soul but a stream of multiple consciousness influenced by karma. Just cause and effect basically just of those consciousness.

    Pythagoras taught that the soul is immortal and undergoes a series of reincarnations. Each life is an opportunity for the soul to purify and ascend to a higher state of being. This purification reflected a different level of mathematical knowledge while impurity reflected lack of mathematical metaphysical knowledge.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Thank you for the thoughtful explanation. I still don't understand why people would look forward to being reborn as something that has no resemblance to who they already are. The philosophical point seems mute.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Buddhists have as a goal escaping it and all conditioned reality. . Theoretically, some Hindu traditions see it as a good thing but it is because it reflects your nature. Others hold that it is good but there is a better state usually a Loka with a God or realizing the real nature of the atman as a part of God or as a single essence that is also appearing as God.

        Yeah and Pythagoras was also a nutcase who thought fava beans contained human souls fresh from the underworld and died trying to save his precious beans

        We don't know exactly the reason why the beans were prohibited. He clearly believed that reincarnation was bad because it was caused by being impure and not knowing the real mathematical reality.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Why do buddhists even think it's escapable? How do they know Buddha didnt end up back in the cycle?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            I think they would say that the Buddha had Nirvana with remainder while alive but did not suffer. This means that he could suffer physical pain like back pain but since there was no craving to exist or not exist as something, or having a soul or essence of any form, he did not suffer. True cessation had occurred. This appeared while he was alive in Buddhist narrative. Upon, death he passed into Nirvana. Nirvana is not really a state of being or place. It is that unconditioned and unafflicted experience of reality being outside of conditioning or dependent origination.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          Yes, yes. But how is this a return of your dead self into life if you don't know anything about who you were?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          >Theoretically, some Hindu traditions see it as a good thing but it is because it reflects your nature. Others hold that it is good but there is a better state usually a Loka with a God or realizing the real nature of the atman as a part of God or as a single essence that is also appearing as God.
          It is what it is.
          Reincarnation is the natural consequence of believing in an immortal soul. Since the essence is preserved it has to face the consequences of karma. Since one life can't create enough karma there must be other lives. Forwards and backwards.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        I'm pretty sure most people don't see at as a specifically good thing they look forward to, they just see it as a natural thing that happens regardless of whether you like it.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          I understand. But if you're going to believe in something, why not believe in something more pleasant?

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Because the people who believe in a religion usually aren't choosing it based on what's pleasant, they're not really consciously choosing at all. It's just what they ended up believing, usually because it's what's been told, maybe because it's true.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah and Pythagoras was also a nutcase who thought fava beans contained human souls fresh from the underworld and died trying to save his precious beans

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        That's the price you pay for genius:
        >Be really gud at something
        >Also be crazy

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Yeah, there are even some people who will assert that reincarnation is real but the consciousness of a person can shard into separate pieces. That results in weird hypothetical cases where a man can reincarnate into a new life and be haunted by a shard of his former life that never reincarnated. It also brings up hypothetical cases of a person reincarnating into multiple people.

  3. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It is dumb. It is a pagan cope for the actual truth, which is that they will die and be judged by God.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      I'm not posting for sake of comparative religion. I'm attempting to better understand a philosophy that is still a mystery to me. I'm not an Eastern Philosophy dude

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      thats not true.
      christendom teaches that your reincarnate over and over, until you become able to discern the truth and be set free.

      there are 2 deaths.
      the 1st death is transmigration aka reincarnation.
      the 2nd death is when you have had your billions of incarnations and still could not manage to exit hell by turning from your evil ways, then you will be permanently blotted out, when the aeon ends.

      research reincarnation in christendom. it was only removed later on, when original sin etc. were introduced and salvation by faith alone.
      Jesus never rejected reincarnation, he was in fact curious what people thought about him etc.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        and this was only possible when the true, universal meaning of the allegory of the cross was not yet lost:
        https://archive.4plebs.org/x/thread/37872485/#q37876445

        its the same truth in all religions. the same way.

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          very interesting read, thanks anon

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Who?

  4. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Pretty sure that's the point OP. In most eastern philosophies I'm familiar with karma/reincarnation are considered to be a trap that you need to escape from.
    I think only the really modernized or westernized version of it tries to teach you that it's something normal.

    The idea is that we're all eternal beings, but constantly re-incarnating into this 1 world is like a prison.
    There's all kinds of eastern philosophies on how to break free from the karma wheel.

  5. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Reincarnation is extremely dumb anon

  6. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    I had a thought. Let me put the question this way. In an effort to expedite the dialog here...
    >Be Rocky Road cream
    >Get eaten
    >Be sent back to ice cream shop
    >No longer Rocky Road
    >Now you are vanilla
    Still Ice cream? Yee
    Still the same? No

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      no your not cause im moronic and im still a virgin

  7. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    1. the memories are not deleted. you simply forget them, in the same way you probably don't remember what you ate for breakfast the morning you turned 5. With sufficient memory jogging, they can resurface, if perhaps a little hazy, human memory is somewhat unreliable and malleable.

    2. personality changes are largely permanent. People with amnesia don't typically become entirely different people. Even if they do forget some of the wisdom they knew in their former life, they regain it much faster, it comes naturally, feels old and familiar and intuitive.

    It's something that's easier to understand once you've experienced it and realized you're experiencing than to understand it purely hypothetically.

  8. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The thing I've come to contemplate is if consciousness is separate from material/body (as it appears to be so) what exactly it takes with it.

    It becomes a crapshoot of what can actually be sent back and forth, and in my honest opinion it is very difficult to update your mind with a legitimate memory from the past because your consciousness may not even take basic or mundane things with it. Past life stuff seems to manifest more in unnatural fixations or illogical fears; things that either confounded or pleasured consciousness. I would honestly argue that most of the personality that you incur now is to die with the body as it is a bodily personality.

    Keeping things simple, why would something like consciousness take harmful memories back with it to what could only be described as a realm of bliss (to everyone who has encountered these through death and revival experiences). Plus, imagine being stuck as you are now forever; incomplete, hurt, wrathful, unfulfilled, etc. Thus isn't how we're supposed to be, so consciousness intrinsically discards the mortal woes upon completion of mortal life.

    In my more honest thoughts, I feel that as conscious beings we make our "self" which supercedes the personality, a form of existence in which we recognize what is our perfect form. I feel by doing so, we allow such a self to be born unto; to gestate what we truly wish to be before releasing ourselves to that which lies beyond. The main problem is people design these idealized selves so bound to mundane and Earthly desires that the consciousness boomerangs back to a mortal life. If it's goals are to be a 1%er, you're just gonna keep retrying until you are.

    For some people, they might not come back for a long, long, long time as their conscious self is molded into something that truly represents their Modus.

    There, the real mechanism of conscious existence presents itself.

  9. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    it is, reincarnation without memory is lame

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      Wait, you guys don't remember? That's new to me...

  10. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Buddha showed me all of my past lives in a dream recently even though I'm a Christian so I mean I'm not supposed to believe in it, but it's kinda true.

  11. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The idea that losing your memories means you're no longer you is a common concern when it comes to reincarnation. But from various spiritual and metaphysical perspectives, this can be seen as just part of the greater scheme of existence and growth.

    Robert Monroe, a well-known figure in the study of out-of-body experiences and consciousness, offers some intriguing insights into this topic. In his books, particularly Journeys Out of the Body and Far Journeys, Monroe describes his experiences and observations in altered states of consciousness, which include encounters with other entities and glimpses into different dimensions of existence.

    Monroe suggests that the physical world is just one layer of a much more complex reality. In this framework, reincarnation serves as a mechanism for soul growth and evolution. When a soul reincarnates, it might lose its conscious memories of past lives, but it retains the essence and lessons learned from those experiences. This is because the core of who you are—your higher self or soul—remains intact and continues to evolve through each lifetime.

    From Monroe's perspective, the loss of specific memories can be seen as a way to ensure that each new life is a fresh start, allowing the soul to focus on new lessons and experiences without being overly burdened by past traumas or attachments. This process can be thought of as a kind of cosmic game where the objective is to grow and evolve through a variety of experiences.

    Monroe also explores the idea that some souls might be tricked or coerced into reincarnating. This aligns with certain belief systems that suggest there are entities or forces that benefit from keeping souls tethered to the cycle of birth and death. In these scenarios, the loss of memory might be a way to keep souls from realizing their true nature and potential, thus keeping them within the cycle.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      However, whether one sees reincarnation as a choice or a trick, the underlying idea is that the essence of who you are—your soul or higher self—continues to exist and evolve. The loss of memories is just a temporary condition, much like how we forget dreams upon waking, but the experiences and growth remain embedded in our deeper consciousness.

      In summary, while the loss of memories can be disconcerting from a human perspective, it can be viewed as a necessary aspect of the soul's journey toward greater understanding and enlightenment. This perspective encourages us to see each life as an opportunity for growth, rather than a complete loss of our true selves.

  12. 1 month ago
    Thought leader of /pol/

    It's not about you like or hate it. It's about accepting the reality. As Buddhist i understand why you hate it . Because it's cruel truth . And i am sure that is why Buddhism is not popular like other religions.

  13. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    >whatever I returned as would not be me
    Correct. What you think opf as you is a temporary shell of bodsy and mind.
    "You" are destroyed every life.
    Rarely, a mental body persists through different physical bodies.
    None of it is YOU.
    You are the soul.
    You are not this body and mind that gets destroyed.

    The problem you likely have is you think reincarnation is meant to teach you something.
    That is bullshit.

  14. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The fool's idea of reincarnation:
    >oh good, I am in a body to learn and report back, I should go through all the bodies and learn what I can
    The wise:
    >how fortunate i am briefly in this one body that can think on this shit
    >I have no time to waste, let me get out of this cycle before I lose my intellect and get dragged through all these lives of suffering again

  15. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Well, memories are impermanent sensory clusters, even if you identify with them (which you shouldn't) you're not the same you were a second ago, you're just creating this illusion of continuity by giving your memories a controlled margin of error in their fidelity.

    What reincarnates isn't the soul (ego(sensory conglomerate)), but the spirit (awareness), naturally memories will be lost during the process of the soul unraveling, since memories are part of the soul, the ego. Funny part is, if you really want to keep your soul from unraveling (for whatever purpose), you first need to stop identifying with it in order to keep it safe from a most suitable position after death.

    If your identity lies in the soul after death, the shock will be such that will leave you unable to act properly and you will just drift to your next destination. If your identity lies in the spirit (pure awareness) after death, the shock to the soul won't suppose a problem and you will be able to be in control of the situation.

  16. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    U r part of a greater movement called humanity… at least it should be realtime when alive I guess… what would you consider as knowing else wise? look up your own history it’s part of yours too lil b***h. Just cuz u don’t know shit doesn’t mean there are other people who need to play with mommy(unreal reality, not the head simulation) in greater capacities…

  17. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Based on all you anons' helpful explanations, I think I understand a bit more. But I really don't like this Eastern philosophical concept of everything just getting recycled throughout all of time. I still much prefer the Western concept of good and evil, a beginning and an end, and the idea of finality. I guess I personally believe all that I am is the sum of my education and memories. And if I have a soul, it is unique and belongs to a creator.

  18. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    Your karmas are logged in what is known as "Karan Shareer/body" and all your experiences in your current life is/are the result of your past karmas, which in turn create new karmas.
    There is free will but there are also some past karmas so strong that they will have fixed destination or what is called fate that you can't change.
    The amount of free will is limited its usage will reduce it, so for instance if you don't work hard in your teenage/adult life then you'll have to struggle hard in future and you won't be able to change it no matter what (give or take)
    The Mother Nature or what is known as Maya is really kind and she'll give you whatever you desire in this life or in other but it will create new bondages.
    This cycle will go on, till your Shakti meets the Shiva or you worship your diety so much that he/she blesses you.
    The end is either you find salvation i.e you stop existing or you become immortal and enjoy the world/ direct it to your liking.

    Aghora 3 Law of Karma is a nice read on this topic

  19. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's not your memories that stay, it's the karma you decide they mean during your life review

  20. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    A few years ago I was sitting in a pub garden on a sunny afternoon. I was the only person there, it was quiet, and I had just been in a therapy session and was feeling quite spaced out.

    I was watching the bubbles in a pint of shandy and had a sudden thought about reincarnation. Now previously I had just accepted the straightforward version of a soul living multiple lifetimes. But this was different. The thought that came to me was something I'd never considered before, like it just came out of nowhere, or was given to me.

    I watched the bubbles of gas rise through the liquid and the thought was, is this how reincarnation works? The bubbles form from the diffuse gas. So in this metaphor, the gas is the diffuse field of consciousness, not individualised. But each bubble comes into being and thinks of itself as an individual. It rises through the liquid like an individual going through life, and then as it reaches the surface of the liquid, the end of life, it returns to the gas.

    And the reason that we might have past life memories is that when the bubble formed it took on some of the experiences which other bubbles had before they returned to the gas and deposited their memories back into it.

    So maybe not an exact analogy, but in thinking about it since, I haven't had any sense of incongruity. For example, as a model it could also explain why we feel that we may have had past lives or have past life memories. The 'bubbles' we inhabit in this life are pretty complex. DNA, heritage, culture, upbringing. The old idea of 'the soul chooses the conditions of its life' would I think be more elegantly explained by the field of consciousness resonating with or recognising in a new life the conditions which would allow it further experience and growth, and those themes then finding expression in an individual's life, rather than it being an individual soul's journey.

  21. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    We're all made up of star dust. Patterns occur at random and at will. I'm sure the visions, if any, would come from lives lived at least trillions of years ago. And all the universe seems to have steadfast is time. Isn't that beyond the cereal bowl?

  22. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    It's more complicated than it seems. Michael Newton who wrote books on the space (afterlife) between lives by working via past life regressions noticed that there's a real self, be it called soul, spirit or whatever, that is the real you and which contains the memories of all the previous lives. I think that's what the book argued, been several years since I read it.
    I think the memories aren't gone in a strict way, during regressions it's discovered that people's fears, phobias and traumas are caused by previous lives' memories and feelings, which means they still exist in some way, just unconsciously. Carl Jung also addressed this when talking about the unconscious.
    The idea of an ego death that is present mostly in Eastern religions and new age stuff also mentions that the human ego is not our real self and that the real self is actually the union with the everything and the absolute, the universe as a whole. People have also experienced this during psychedelic experiences with LSD, mushrooms or DMT. It can be a deep and transforming (positive) experience for some and traumatic for others.
    Regarding the topic of reincarnation itself, I would argue that Eastern religions and philosophies have it right to a degree. During past life regressions, while authors like Newton and that other guy who is quite famous and has written books on the matter present reincarnation as something positive, there are other authors who work with patients who say that they didn't wanna reincarnate but were coerced and forced by beings that were supposedly good. One of them wrote a book about the nonsense of karma, because he observed that in many of his cases there was no real soul evolution, just people repeating the same mistakes and bringing back the same trauma from past lives and continuing to frick up because of that. Reincarnation is probably a trap to keep people in this prison but you could also argue that it's a positive thing depending on perspective.

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      (Continuing). It can be argued that the ego immediately dies when one dies but there's evidence of the opposite during past lives regressions, NDEs and the like. So all of this suggests that our memories of being human aren't strictly a brain thing. The removal of them during reincarnation might be due to reincarnation being the trap I mentioned or could be due to something else. It's unclear and we'll never know while we're humans. But said removal might not be permanent. However I do think the ego is an illusion to a degree, whether stopping to identify with it means you completely lose your memories is a matter of debate. It's more of an identity thing afaik.
      There's also the thing with ghosts or even mediums. I definitely think mediums are a real thing , if so how do they communicate with dead people if their memories are completely gone? I'm not well versed in mediumship so I might be ignoring something.
      Reincarnation is also more complex than it seems. There was this astro traveler (not Monroe) who encountered his spirit guide during a trip , who turned out to be himself from a distant future. Time in reality isn't linear so while we exist right now some future "us" might be living somewhere. This traveler argued that reincarnation isn't exactly about a spirit dying and being born again over and over but I forgot the specifics because I don't remember his name.
      Anyway, I think that everything that ever existed is still stored somewhere, memories included, so it's not as black and white as it seems. Hell, with some practices, like deep meditation and the like, you can be able to access your past lives' memories. It reminded me a bit of Avatar where the previous lives of Aang were still somewhere even though Aang was the current reincarnated life.
      I'd like to know others' opinions on all of this

    • 1 month ago
      Anonymous

      >the human ego is not our real self
      This is a dangerous meme and isn't as literally true as new agers would like it to be. It provides a handy ontological basis for 'spiritual bypassing', which is the pursuit of the "real" self without doing the necessary work to heal and integrate the neuroses of the ego. There are plenty of unintegrated wannabe teachers out there who I wouldn't trust to walk my dog, let alone shepherd my soul.

      • 1 month ago
        Anonymous

        Could you explain better what you mean? Eastern religions and experiences with psychedelics and i think even meditation and science say that the ego is an illusion that is either gone with death or when someone deletes your memories before you reincarnate again. If that's not it what is it?

        • 1 month ago
          Anonymous

          First, we have to define what we mean by the word ego. We in the West were introduced to it by Freud but even he didn't actually use it, he used a German word, and the word ego was from one of his early translators. Similarly, ego in translations of Eastern systems is going to mean something slightly different.

          All of the terms we might use to attempt to provide a definition are going to have different meanings to different people. My suggestion, or working model, is that our personality-self, our regular daily experience of who we are, is a composite formed from the influence of the 'higher' self, and what Wilhelm Reich called our 'characterological armouring.'

          So in my model, the higher self is the plan or the blueprint for who we could be. It's the original promise for the best possible version of ourselves, and it is always there, the still small voice, the guide to good choices.

          Reich's characterological armouring is the ego defence, all the wounds and traumas of life which we couldn't process at the time, held in tensions in the body and energetic freezing or crystallising of the mind and emotions. (As an aside, there was an article on Neuroscience News this week which used the term crystallising. I thought it was just me being dramatic.) These defence mechanisms produce our habitual reactions to the things which 'press our buttons.'

          The process I'm describing when I talk about spritual bypassing is that some teachers talk only about the aspects of our being which are the higher self aspects. There can be positive benefits in this; focusing on the health, the power to grow and transcend, to rise above the mundane. But it also leaves the huge possibility of a vast internal sewer of unprocessed shit, hidden beneath a veneer of spiritual growth.

          I've had experiences of seeing the post-death "review" process. continued-

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            The armouring aspect of our self exists in the emotional and etheric and to a lesser extent the mental bodies, and yes these are 'shed' at death, but the person in review seems to keep some aspects of their identity to use as a working vehicle. We do have an opportunity to look at our lives and our choices without the emotional charge. I don't know what happens after the review process, I've only ever seen darkness and haven't tried to look to deeply into that. I assume the rest of the identity as it exists in the working mental and astral bodies is then stripped away.

            So yes, I'm not contradicting the idea that
            >the ego is an illusion that is either gone with death or when someone deletes your memories before you reincarnate again
            but the meaning and the value in considering the meachanics if you like, of what goes into making up the ego, can be too easily lost if we take sphrases like that at face value. These ideas will also tie in with conversations about left hand/right hand paths, and hedonism vs transcendence, etc.

            tl;dr, don't ignore your neuroses.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            sp, *too* deeply, and *phrases*

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >The armouring aspect of our self exists in the emotional and etheric and to a lesser extent the mental bodies, and yes these are 'shed' at death, but the person in review seems to keep some aspects of their identity to use as a working vehicle. We do have an opportunity to look at our lives and our choices without the emotional charge.
            So you're arguing what another anon said above, that the memories and emotions an individual had in life whether positive or negative are gone when you die, but they're kept in an unconscious way which would be the karma that's passed from life to life? The armouring is gone but the real self and its identity/personality continues

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Well I'm not really arguing the point, because I don't know. How they're
            >kept in an unconscious way which would be the karma that's passed from life to life
            is the big question here. I used to assume it was all linear and personal, that's my 'self', my karma, and 'I' will reincarnate. And I've had very clear recall which seems like it was 'me', but even that was slightly different. Like 'me with different clothes on', 'clothes' here being the subtle sense of my own identity. But then I had the experience here

            A few years ago I was sitting in a pub garden on a sunny afternoon. I was the only person there, it was quiet, and I had just been in a therapy session and was feeling quite spaced out.

            I was watching the bubbles in a pint of shandy and had a sudden thought about reincarnation. Now previously I had just accepted the straightforward version of a soul living multiple lifetimes. But this was different. The thought that came to me was something I'd never considered before, like it just came out of nowhere, or was given to me.

            I watched the bubbles of gas rise through the liquid and the thought was, is this how reincarnation works? The bubbles form from the diffuse gas. So in this metaphor, the gas is the diffuse field of consciousness, not individualised. But each bubble comes into being and thinks of itself as an individual. It rises through the liquid like an individual going through life, and then as it reaches the surface of the liquid, the end of life, it returns to the gas.

            And the reason that we might have past life memories is that when the bubble formed it took on some of the experiences which other bubbles had before they returned to the gas and deposited their memories back into it.

            So maybe not an exact analogy, but in thinking about it since, I haven't had any sense of incongruity. For example, as a model it could also explain why we feel that we may have had past lives or have past life memories. The 'bubbles' we inhabit in this life are pretty complex. DNA, heritage, culture, upbringing. The old idea of 'the soul chooses the conditions of its life' would I think be more elegantly explained by the field of consciousness resonating with or recognising in a new life the conditions which would allow it further experience and growth, and those themes then finding expression in an individual's life, rather than it being an individual soul's journey.

            and it made me rethink the personal aspect of reincarnation. I didn't want to believe it, I wanted 'my' karma, 'my' incarnations to continue. But the concept really did drop into my mind as if it was being delivered. I tend to pay attention to experiences like that, they're a bit more substantial than just ruminating about something.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            Also yes, in the review process
            >The armouring is gone but the real self and its identity/personality continues
            Quite how that balance is achieved I don't know. But it's like the person you knew is all there, just calm, peaceful, content, while doing the work.

          • 1 month ago
            Anonymous

            >Quite how that balance is achieved I don't know. But it's like the person you knew is all there, just calm, peaceful, content, while doing the work.
            Very interesting. There's no way to know for sure of course, but my theory is that the soul/spirit keeps the memories of every incarnation, the "personality" of the ego isn't really deleted or destroyed forever as its most defining characteristics whether positive or negative are kept in every incarnated life. During regressions people realize that they repeat patterns of previous lives and even some tastes are inherited from life to life. I think the loss of memories which include forgetting about your soul and the nature of the universe is only a temporary thing and when you're back to the space between lives you remember everything again. Since the core of everything is love and peace that's what you feel while the negativity is gone as you suggested. The soul then continues just being until it manages to escape the samsara wheel.

  23. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    The concept of reincarnation is very politicised. While you die, the way you behave and desire live on forever unless sublimated.

  24. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    If time is not a thing, which it isn't, then there's no reason to incarnate linearly. If everything that ever has and will be done is done then all you're doing is porting in to a specific time. This dismisses karma as a thing. If there is no karma then there is no "good" or "bad", there are just things that happen. "Good" and "bad" are false concepts like time. Have you ever done something and thought that you genuinely don't have a clue why you did that? Heinous things. You're just along for the ride boyo and you have no semblance of control. Control over your life is another illusion. Free will? How can that be if everything is done already? The question is why fricking come here? We could see everything we're going to go through. Pain, suffering, humiliation, whats the fricking point? My higest highs have never gotten to within even a fraction of the magnitude of my lowest lows. In what exact way are we not able to achieve whatever the frick the goal is in a "soul realm" (for lack of a better phrase) that is so much better to achieve in a shitty, fricked up, nonsense physical world? The more I think I have things figured out the more I realize I don't know a fricking thing.

  25. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    the self never truly existed to begin with - anatta

  26. 1 month ago
    Anonymous

    In a very hypothetical scenario where you lost all of your memories and interpretations, it is true that you would not be the current self that you perceive yourself to be, but you would still be a person of some sort, no? Perhaps a little bit moronic (or a lot), but it still would be you, no? I don't enjoy saying this (which is a lie, I do enjoy saying this); but, you might have literally answered your own question here. "Without my memories whatever I returned as would not be me." That's not you disproving reincarnation, that's you highlighting how poor and surface-level your idea of what you are is. "If I lost all my memories and interpretations, I would not be myself." How can you be anything but yourself, anon? Do you not see the mental trap that you have created for yourself with your attachment to your current temporal expression? You are literally so attached to the set of ideas about who you are that you cannot even imagine yourself as something separate from them. Lol. Lmao even.

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