Islamic wizards

For various reasons , it’s just too hard for me to truly quit Islam societally speaking; so I’m kinda tryna make it my own by mixing /x/ and gnostic ideas with Sufism and still look like a surface level muslim.

But how would I take it to the next level ? It feels like uncharted waters to attempt - are there any Islamic wizards in history or on /x/ with any insight?

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  1. 2 months ago
    Baba Ak

    As-salaam alaikum, brother. I too am a 30 year old virgin living in my mother’s basement. Perhaps you can join my discord and we can mutually jerk off to BBC porn, inshallah.

  2. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    A lot of mystics in Christian Europe kept a low profile and spoke through coded language. You can do it if you know when to speak and when to shut up.

  3. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I don't know enough about Islam to ever call myself Muslim, but in it's core, what I got from talking to muslim friends, to me it makes the most sense out of the three big abrahamic religions.

    Holy trinity from christianity and the dead magic zombie carpenter just seems schizophrenic and doesn't make sense, and don't get me started on the israelites.

    I believe in one God, the one who revealed himself to me in my psychotic (or gnostic, depends on who you ask) times. I think all real religious experiences stem from this God. I'd call him Allah, but I don't think he's that big on names, above that petty shit we humans struggle about with each other.

    I've been to places you couldn't even begin to imagine. Suffism and Islam seems like a great springboard into the sea of mysticism where the real wizards go swimming daily, and sometimes deep diving too. There are no islamic wizards, just wizards.

    Now go read some suffi poems by rumi and contemplate on them while start dancing by spinning in circles and just don't stop- or something. There are many ways to gnosis, you'll find yours.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >I'd call him Allah, but I don't think he's that big on names, above that petty shit we humans struggle about with each other.
      'Allah' isn't really a name
      It means 'The Beginning and the End'
      similar to 'Alpha and Omega'

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        oh shiit I thought it was a moon god they co-opted , where can one read more about what allah really means?

        • 2 months ago
          Negi Springfield

          There really isn't much to read about. Allah comes from Aramaic. The Arabs got the Aramaic word for God from the Catholic Church when it came to Arabia.

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          No, this narrative literally comes from Chick Tracts lol. Doesn't mean Alpha and Omega either though, it comes from al + illaha, The God. It's like the English word God only monotheistic exclusivity is built in. And the 99 Names (of which there are more than 99) are not proper names either but the divine attributes. As-Samad = The Eternal, The Sovereign, The Provider etc. for instance.

  4. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    The one of note is Al Khdir. At least the one teacher you should start with if pursuing Islamic mystic arts. Its mostly thermagy, weather bending, animal control and summoning/binding.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Thanks will look into him

      A lot of mystics in Christian Europe kept a low profile and spoke through coded language. You can do it if you know when to speak and when to shut up.

      any good books or anything like that on how christian mystics operated? I don't mind learning across traditions.

      https://i.imgur.com/v9yJT7Q.jpg

      I don't know enough about Islam to ever call myself Muslim, but in it's core, what I got from talking to muslim friends, to me it makes the most sense out of the three big abrahamic religions.

      Holy trinity from christianity and the dead magic zombie carpenter just seems schizophrenic and doesn't make sense, and don't get me started on the israelites.

      I believe in one God, the one who revealed himself to me in my psychotic (or gnostic, depends on who you ask) times. I think all real religious experiences stem from this God. I'd call him Allah, but I don't think he's that big on names, above that petty shit we humans struggle about with each other.

      I've been to places you couldn't even begin to imagine. Suffism and Islam seems like a great springboard into the sea of mysticism where the real wizards go swimming daily, and sometimes deep diving too. There are no islamic wizards, just wizards.

      Now go read some suffi poems by rumi and contemplate on them while start dancing by spinning in circles and just don't stop- or something. There are many ways to gnosis, you'll find yours.

      very based anon , I'm not a big dervish (the spinners) guy myself but definitely will up my contemplation game.

  5. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I see Nineveh Shadrach as a modern Islamic wizard.
    He's so wise and good that I will just leave djinn stuff alone for now since I respect it.

  6. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Where do I start with sufism?

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Like any neophyte wizard...everywhere with a combination of trial and error.

      Thanks will look into him

      [...]
      any good books or anything like that on how christian mystics operated? I don't mind learning across traditions.

      [...]
      very based anon , I'm not a big dervish (the spinners) guy myself but definitely will up my contemplation game.

      Np. Al khadr is a big part of early Islam and theres some fun stories about him surfing a giant fish.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      With the 5 pillars and studying the basics of Islam like aqeedah, fiqh, and hadith science. Anyone who tells you that Sufism is something that can be separated off from normative Islam is a New Age grifter or moron. Historically the great Sufism were much more conscientious about following the law and the externals of the religion, not less. But modern Westerners are gluttons who want everything, even spirituality, to revolve around the individual and immediate gratification so people don't like that answer. The tariqas exist for a reason too, you can't practice Sufism on your own or at the very least you'll be a million times more likely to fail if you do.

  7. 2 months ago
    Negi Springfield

    >societally speaking
    Ok that's fine. So what part do you "do" socially? If you're talking about going to the mosque and praying, then you can do like most. Just go through the motions convincingly. You can even keep the Arab trappings and language involved. Just look up traditions tied to sihr and jadu. Somewhat involved is the country you're from, but it is far from a big deal. If you're not from a specific country, just pick one that has a cool Arab/Islamic occult tradition or something similar. Also keep in mind that the ideas you're having are far from unique and many a Muslim has studied things beyond Quran/Hadith/Halal sources so to speak. good luck and Allah yabarak!

  8. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Gohar Shahi.

  9. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hii Muslim here ,came here by curiosity from other board.
    I left islam at a certain point in my life, I was open about it even tho I lived with my parents and had to get in daily fights.
    Hypocrits with be open about it to me, I hated them more than Muslims.
    By Forgetting god you will forget yourself.
    Wich you might not believe.
    But by abandoning who you really are
    And not acting according to it you will forget yourself as well.
    Your inner world by getting disconnected with your outer world.
    Will not get any thing from outside, and you will end up like static water.
    Because of this cowardnes you will be a coward in every other thing.
    Maybe you can try do it bit by bit, say that you don't want to pray since you can't see why. Say that you can't understand how could Mohammad sallallahu alaihi wasallam be a prophet...
    Say what you think without giving your self the label.
    Muslims don't have the right to say you are not and have to act like you are. So you might be quite safe.
    Why do you want to do magic?
    You don't even have the strength for acting as you want to because of social pressure or interest.
    Any jin will easily get a hold of you.
    To be honest In islam you have the right to use jins. But you won't be able to control them ,they will use you.
    I advise you to read the quran, do it when you feel like it open maybe a random page to have sign.
    I don't want to help you in doing magic, but read the passages in the quran we're it talks about it.
    read Ta ha surat fully.
    You can also read the hadis about magic.
    Do it So that you will know what magic is at least.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >By Forgetting god you will forget yourself.
      most accurate line in this whole thing

      One would think Ghayat al-Hakim would be the most obvious place to start. The author praises Allah in every damn sentence yet he's depicting a whole mystic/magical system influenced by other models, which in essence is what you want to do.

      wahdat ul wajood

      Gohar Shahi.

      thanks for some ideas anons

      Bruh, Islamic wizards are just devout Muslims. You haven't heard all the tales of deeply pious Muslims performing miracles and shit. What else do you want?

      >You haven't heard all the tales of deeply pious Muslims performing miracles and shit. What else do you want?

      No I haven't heard these tales - name some people

      My remaining question is - kinda like what Cube anon was touching on - is islamic daily prayer a dead end - or can I co opt it in a way to get closer to God? Would those prayers still be beneficial for a mystic who doesn't necessarily believe the shia/sunni interpretation and even the version of God that is generally put forth - but the true ONE god above all the human traits ascribed?

      • 2 months ago
        Anonymous

        >the true ONE god above all the human traits ascribed?
        You should study more aqeedah before you go running after magic, Islam already has what you want. From aqeeda tahawiyya, which is afaik the earliest agreed upon Athari creed: "Allah has anger and pleasure but not like that of human beings". The Orthodox position on the divine attributes is that they're different in kind from their seeming human parallels, not only in degree. When Allah is called ar-Rahman and ar-Raheem, that doesn't only mean He's *more* gracious and merciful than human beings on the same scale, rather His mercy and graciousness is an entirely different thing and can't be considered the same as human mercy and graciousness.

        Mainstream Islamic theology is already extremely apophatic and this is the Athari position I'm telling you, the guys who get accused of anthropomorphizing by Shias and extreme Sufis. (Unfairly btw, the traditional Athari position on those verses is to affirm them without explanation and even Atharis like Ibn Taymiyyah who said God has a body said it's totally unlike all created bodies and can't be compared to anything so it was still an apophatic position. Different issue though, my point is that even the most orthodox theology doesn't make Allah into some humanlike dude up in the clouds).

        • 2 months ago
          Anonymous

          the problem for many former muslims is muhammad himself -- he takes way too many conveniences and liberties and one of the essential realities of muslims is attesting to his greatness of character when he is flawed but decent overall/mid at best and downright psychopathic at worst.

          I think what OP is trying to do is seperate all the politics out of it - but it's really really hard cause muhammad is soooo baked into it even if people around him through the ages have done great work to expound upon islamic theology. They expounded likely upon assuming muhammad would never be questioned or had only heard distant things from other lands and just assumed "surely he must be a great man" - so they had resolute faith in a theology (however beautiful) that was ultimately based in a lie (not the relationship with God, but all the last messenger and political business) , how do you have faith in a theology that keeps praising a man that likely did not have the qualities that are always given to him?

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            I actually think the fact that there isn't a separation between politics and religion in Islam is one of its main attractions. Aside from Shiism where you have the imamate it isn't an absolute union but there's still a union. Political authority exists only in relation to divine authority and the vertical dimension of being and is circumscribed by it. Rather than the modern approach where political authority (in theory only, in reality modern political systems are all much more overbearing than premodern ones were) flows up from a mythical, divinized The People rather than down from God.

            A lot of the things that strike westerners as mundane or worldly about Islam are examples of the same fundamental thing too I'd say. The quest to turn absolutely every aspect of life into a sacred space and to unite outer conformity to God's law with the inner journey to God. The jihad of the battlefield is paralleled in the jihad against your nafs/self, obediently staying away from pork should be accompanied by staying away from the moral qualities of pigs as well. Even the way Islam approaches the body is unitive, for westerners raised on platonized Christianity and cartesian dualism its easy to see a bodily Paradise as goofy but again you have the union between the inner and the outer, there is no clean distinction between body and soul in Islam.

            And Muhammad being more worldly compared to Jesus is also it's own kind of strength. Jesus in the gospels is an almost ghostlike figure who doesn't do much besides wander around preaching before he dies. There's very little to grasp ahold of. With Muhammad you have a model for business, warfare, leadership, familial relations, friendship, and most of the other areas of human existence that occupy the vast majority of our time as well as a model for asceticism and the mystical path. He's a balanced figure in a way to he Jesus available to us isn't. Can you really fully imitate Jesus without becoming a monk? I don't think so.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Yeah, it's own strength, much balanced figure tbh. Let's imitate Momo and frick children

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Do you think there might be a reason this wasn't a theme of anti-Islam polemics before modern times? You should read what Jonathan Edwards wrote about Islam, you'll be pretty shocked at how different the points of agreement and disagreement are from the ones you're used to.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Well, Epstein’s list has been public for a while yet none have faced any repercussion.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            The mistake isn't the structure of Islam or combining religion and politics/society , it's the fact they did all that on the back of a guy who:
            > banned art with some religious excuse but actually cause artists started making fun of him
            > who met criticism with assassinations
            > who literally did the laziest sales trick in the book (from his merchant days) promises a bunch of high test barbarians a bunch of virgins in heaven as their reward
            > married his brother in laws girl or something cause god willed it lol
            > and my personal favourite - god wants you to get outta my house and not overstay your welcome - it's not even hadith , it's smack dab in the Quran

            It isn't the fact islam is structured that way - it's that even the guy whose supposedly the best guy co-opted it for his own purposes and benefits - very Machiavellian. The only justification I can reasonably see is the version of muhammad we have is re-written by later pedos and warlords / leaders who just pinned their bullshit on muhammad and didn't take credit themselves. The only reason I think this might have even been possible is -- he died poor and gave everything away , his final sermon was about unity , the final sermon would have been most fresh in the minds of the sahabah and these two traits at the end alone make me feel he was at minimum a spiritual fellow.

            > can't follow jesus without being a monk
            Can you be an advanced muslim without basically being a monk either? It's all retired old guys after kids and work who really have time to dive deep. Young ones are social media influencers.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Most of your post is youtube debate sphere stuff that's been addressed a billion times so I'm not very interested in rehashing it. I will say though that it's clear you haven't read much sira for yourself and if you did you'd find much more than Muhammad's final acts to confirm to you that he was spiritual. You'd also find much more to take issue with, I'm not saying it's all palatable by modern standards because it isn't. But this stereotyped image of Muhammad as a mad, demon possessed sensualist, cynic and credulous Bedouin who had his head filled with heresy by others is a house of cards. You'll notice some of those things I mentioned are mutually exclusive or nearly so, but the Pamela Gellers will flip back and forth between different framings of Muhammad that don't cohere and expect you not to notice. If source A could mean he was mad they'll show you that, if source B could mean he was a cynic they'll show you that. They'll never tell you how those two things cohere or show you sources that can't be used to paint a negative picture. It's very selective and dishonest use of sources.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            [...]
            There's also usually this very perverse strain of mockery running through this stuff. If you see enough of these debates you'll notice that it's almost always the Christians who are ruder, filthier, more prone to revel in slander and blasphemy etc. It can't be explained just by the fact that Jesus is holy in both religions either because you don't see Muslims speaking about figures like Paul or the popes/reformers in the way these people tend to about Muhammad, the sahaba and Muslims in general. I'm not saying it's not possible to have intellectually honest objections to Islam, including moral objections on sexual grounds, obviously. There's just this vibe with the David Wood crowd that feels much like what Pisschrist and Sarah Silverman are to Christianity, like for these people it's not really about honest intellectual engagement but about an antinomian desire to trample on and desecrate things others view as sacred. If someone's dressing in drag and photoshopping pics of beastiality while shouting blasphemies and racial slurs then maybe they don't have the best intentions. It actually seems pretty satanic to me in the sense that it's a mindset all about transgression..

            About monasticism, there's no Islamic basis for entirely withdrawing from society. Itikaf, temporary withdrawal to a mosque, is the closest thing afaik besides Sufi ribats, which were also not exactly comparable to monasteries since they had a military function. Islam's approach to "the world" in the sense of "secular society" (to the extent we can consider secular/religious a valid dichotomy and to the extent that a genuinely Islamic society is ever secular) is a lot more like the Lutheran concept of vocation. All legitimate livelihoods can be turned into a way to glorify God and draw closer to Him and you shouldn't withdraw from mundane life but you shouldn't be attached to it either and should regard it as illusory in some sense.

            You don't have to rehash it, but if you could link to some reputable answers - that would still go a long way. I will give you credit where it's due , you are very well reasoned and have given me pause to reflect - especially your explanation on monasticism, kinda nifty take really.

            Can I ask how you know so much and what kind of muslim you deem yourself to be. I think a deeper study on muhammad is going to be required from here if what you say is true.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            If you want an overall introduction to Islam that captures some of the essence of the religion and relates it to universal themes and modern Western concerns I'd recommend Martin Lings, Charles Le Gai Eaton, Abdul Hakim Murad and Muhammad Asad to start with. That's a very provisional recommendation, they all had/have gigantic theological issues and Lings sira has some major errors (you can find articles addressing what specifically he got wrong). But they're still valuable imo, especially for a Western audience. Blogging Theology is a youtube channel I'd put in the same category as very valuable for conveying Islam to westerners except he doesn't have the theological issues.

            The internet debate side of things has been going for so long that you kind of have to search point by point, there's no one source that's going to address all the usual topics. Yaqeen Institute (who generally speaking are unreliable glowing reformists) has the best article I've seen on the age of consummation issue. Hijab and Dawahman are the only two Muslim debate youtubers I'm aware of who coordinate their work with ulama so I'd watch them if you want videos in this vein. About Muhammad being a supposedly self-interested warlord I'd recommend reading sira and searching for hadiths about zuhd (asceticism). He never ate his fill, regularly prayed for 1/3 of the night until his feet were swollen, spent very little on anything besides bare necessities, upkeep of his wives, charity and jihad. He slept on a rough mat and refused a palace when some sahaba wanted to build him one. His mosque was a wooden building with a palm leaf roof and buildings that rise above two stories are not a great thing in Islam, even architecture is supposed to be humble ideally speaking. He never hit his wives or even yelled at them when they nagged him. There are hadiths saying all that and a lot else like it. If we're going to take the unpalatable hadiths seriously, we need to take those ones seriously too.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            If you want an overall introduction to Islam that captures some of the essence of the religion and relates it to universal themes and modern Western concerns I'd recommend Martin Lings, Charles Le Gai Eaton, Abdul Hakim Murad and Muhammad Asad to start with. That's a very provisional recommendation, they all had/have gigantic theological issues and Lings sira has some major errors (you can find articles addressing what specifically he got wrong). But they're still valuable imo, especially for a Western audience. Blogging Theology is a youtube channel I'd put in the same category as very valuable for conveying Islam to westerners except he doesn't have the theological issues.

            The internet debate side of things has been going for so long that you kind of have to search point by point, there's no one source that's going to address all the usual topics. Yaqeen Institute (who generally speaking are unreliable glowing reformists) has the best article I've seen on the age of consummation issue. Hijab and Dawahman are the only two Muslim debate youtubers I'm aware of who coordinate their work with ulama so I'd watch them if you want videos in this vein. About Muhammad being a supposedly self-interested warlord I'd recommend reading sira and searching for hadiths about zuhd (asceticism). He never ate his fill, regularly prayed for 1/3 of the night until his feet were swollen, spent very little on anything besides bare necessities, upkeep of his wives, charity and jihad. He slept on a rough mat and refused a palace when some sahaba wanted to build him one. His mosque was a wooden building with a palm leaf roof and buildings that rise above two stories are not a great thing in Islam, even architecture is supposed to be humble ideally speaking. He never hit his wives or even yelled at them when they nagged him. There are hadiths saying all that and a lot else like it. If we're going to take the unpalatable hadiths seriously, we need to take those ones seriously too.

            As for assassinations and jihad more generally, two points. 1, Arabia at the time was a society obsessed with poetry, it was an oral culture. Even some diplomacy was conducted in the form of poems, such as Banu Khuza'ah's request for Muslim aid after Quraysh broke the Treaty of Hudaybiyah. So you should of it as being more similar to assassinating a propagandist than assassinating your local slam poet. 2, there was more patience and mercy than Geller will show you. The hypocrites of Medina, including their leader Abd Allah ibn Ubayy, were spared. Muhammad's preference after Badr was not to execute the captives and he cried when he received revelation commanding him to. After taking Mecca, he spared even Hind bint Utba, the woman who killed his favorite uncle (more like his brother in social terms since they were so close in age) Hamza, desecrated his corpse and ate his liver. There are other similar stories in the sira, it's not all harshness. His way, and the Islamic way in general, was to forgive slights against ones self but be ruthless in dealing with slights against God. And there are recorded cases where people were nuisances on an interpersonal level and he was either patient or sometimes even found it amusing depending on what it was.

            All that said, being harsh with the enemies of God means being harsh with the enemies of God and you do have to believe in at least the theoretical desirability of perpetual military jihad if you want to follow the overwhelming majority of classical scholars. And the punishment for blasphemy is death and from what I've been able to tell, the classical position is that anyone can carry that out, that it (unlike the vast majority of sharia which only makes sense in an individual context) doesn't need authorization by a ruler. This gets into larger questions of whether violence can be sacred though and metaphysical questions speech, art and sacrality. I'll leave off on that because I already wrote so much.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            If you want an overall introduction to Islam that captures some of the essence of the religion and relates it to universal themes and modern Western concerns I'd recommend Martin Lings, Charles Le Gai Eaton, Abdul Hakim Murad and Muhammad Asad to start with. That's a very provisional recommendation, they all had/have gigantic theological issues and Lings sira has some major errors (you can find articles addressing what specifically he got wrong). But they're still valuable imo, especially for a Western audience. Blogging Theology is a youtube channel I'd put in the same category as very valuable for conveying Islam to westerners except he doesn't have the theological issues.

            The internet debate side of things has been going for so long that you kind of have to search point by point, there's no one source that's going to address all the usual topics. Yaqeen Institute (who generally speaking are unreliable glowing reformists) has the best article I've seen on the age of consummation issue. Hijab and Dawahman are the only two Muslim debate youtubers I'm aware of who coordinate their work with ulama so I'd watch them if you want videos in this vein. About Muhammad being a supposedly self-interested warlord I'd recommend reading sira and searching for hadiths about zuhd (asceticism). He never ate his fill, regularly prayed for 1/3 of the night until his feet were swollen, spent very little on anything besides bare necessities, upkeep of his wives, charity and jihad. He slept on a rough mat and refused a palace when some sahaba wanted to build him one. His mosque was a wooden building with a palm leaf roof and buildings that rise above two stories are not a great thing in Islam, even architecture is supposed to be humble ideally speaking. He never hit his wives or even yelled at them when they nagged him. There are hadiths saying all that and a lot else like it. If we're going to take the unpalatable hadiths seriously, we need to take those ones seriously too.

            [...]
            As for assassinations and jihad more generally, two points. 1, Arabia at the time was a society obsessed with poetry, it was an oral culture. Even some diplomacy was conducted in the form of poems, such as Banu Khuza'ah's request for Muslim aid after Quraysh broke the Treaty of Hudaybiyah. So you should of it as being more similar to assassinating a propagandist than assassinating your local slam poet. 2, there was more patience and mercy than Geller will show you. The hypocrites of Medina, including their leader Abd Allah ibn Ubayy, were spared. Muhammad's preference after Badr was not to execute the captives and he cried when he received revelation commanding him to. After taking Mecca, he spared even Hind bint Utba, the woman who killed his favorite uncle (more like his brother in social terms since they were so close in age) Hamza, desecrated his corpse and ate his liver. There are other similar stories in the sira, it's not all harshness. His way, and the Islamic way in general, was to forgive slights against ones self but be ruthless in dealing with slights against God. And there are recorded cases where people were nuisances on an interpersonal level and he was either patient or sometimes even found it amusing depending on what it was.

            All that said, being harsh with the enemies of God means being harsh with the enemies of God and you do have to believe in at least the theoretical desirability of perpetual military jihad if you want to follow the overwhelming majority of classical scholars. And the punishment for blasphemy is death and from what I've been able to tell, the classical position is that anyone can carry that out, that it (unlike the vast majority of sharia which only makes sense in an individual context) doesn't need authorization by a ruler. This gets into larger questions of whether violence can be sacred though and metaphysical questions speech, art and sacrality. I'll leave off on that because I already wrote so much.

            And I don't know much at all actually. I know what I do know through reading and listening to lectures but I'm not knowledgeable by Islamic standards. Sunni Islam is the only serious form of Islam. Intra-Sunni divides (Athari vs Asharii, Sufi vs Salafi etc.) are a whole can of worms but I don't like seeing them taken to extremes.

          • 2 months ago
            Anonymous

            Most of your post is youtube debate sphere stuff that's been addressed a billion times so I'm not very interested in rehashing it. I will say though that it's clear you haven't read much sira for yourself and if you did you'd find much more than Muhammad's final acts to confirm to you that he was spiritual. You'd also find much more to take issue with, I'm not saying it's all palatable by modern standards because it isn't. But this stereotyped image of Muhammad as a mad, demon possessed sensualist, cynic and credulous Bedouin who had his head filled with heresy by others is a house of cards. You'll notice some of those things I mentioned are mutually exclusive or nearly so, but the Pamela Gellers will flip back and forth between different framings of Muhammad that don't cohere and expect you not to notice. If source A could mean he was mad they'll show you that, if source B could mean he was a cynic they'll show you that. They'll never tell you how those two things cohere or show you sources that can't be used to paint a negative picture. It's very selective and dishonest use of sources.

            There's also usually this very perverse strain of mockery running through this stuff. If you see enough of these debates you'll notice that it's almost always the Christians who are ruder, filthier, more prone to revel in slander and blasphemy etc. It can't be explained just by the fact that Jesus is holy in both religions either because you don't see Muslims speaking about figures like Paul or the popes/reformers in the way these people tend to about Muhammad, the sahaba and Muslims in general. I'm not saying it's not possible to have intellectually honest objections to Islam, including moral objections on sexual grounds, obviously. There's just this vibe with the David Wood crowd that feels much like what Pisschrist and Sarah Silverman are to Christianity, like for these people it's not really about honest intellectual engagement but about an antinomian desire to trample on and desecrate things others view as sacred. If someone's dressing in drag and photoshopping pics of beastiality while shouting blasphemies and racial slurs then maybe they don't have the best intentions. It actually seems pretty satanic to me in the sense that it's a mindset all about transgression..

            About monasticism, there's no Islamic basis for entirely withdrawing from society. Itikaf, temporary withdrawal to a mosque, is the closest thing afaik besides Sufi ribats, which were also not exactly comparable to monasteries since they had a military function. Islam's approach to "the world" in the sense of "secular society" (to the extent we can consider secular/religious a valid dichotomy and to the extent that a genuinely Islamic society is ever secular) is a lot more like the Lutheran concept of vocation. All legitimate livelihoods can be turned into a way to glorify God and draw closer to Him and you shouldn't withdraw from mundane life but you shouldn't be attached to it either and should regard it as illusory in some sense.

  10. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    wahdat ul wajood

  11. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    One would think Ghayat al-Hakim would be the most obvious place to start. The author praises Allah in every damn sentence yet he's depicting a whole mystic/magical system influenced by other models, which in essence is what you want to do.

  12. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Islam is demiurge (Saturn) worship.
    The Quran is an extension of the babylonian Talmud.
    Mohammed was a masonic israelite and his first wife was a catholic.
    Islam revolves around degrading the son, the only truth in flesh.
    Muslims were put under a spell with the shahada (similar to christians with their sacrifice salvation).
    There is no truth in sacrifice, Yahusha was murdered. The sacrifice salvation ritual is of luciferian nature.
    Yahushas message was that one must embrace the enternal and independent truth within, to become one with the father.
    Not a single abrahamic religion mentions the reincarnation trap. Christians refuse to accept the astral realm as a real dimension. Christians unironically demonize the pineal gland. Both muslims and christians demonize the Kundalini serpent and declare it as fake holy spirit. The demiurge "banished" us for eating from the tree of knowledge. Can knowledge be knowledge without being based on truth? We "sinned", because we wanted to know the truth. Earth is built upon lies and is purely illusionary.
    Hell is being made into reality by convincing the collective consciousness to believe in it.
    Yahusha was of truth, but his teachings were heavily corrupted. The bible contains extremely precious wisdom, but can only be decoded by embracing the truth within first.

    Coincidence that Kaaba (cube) + Allah (god) forms into Kabbalah (cube-god)?

    Seek truth.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      No one has asked, open a thread with your shit.

    • 2 months ago
      Ishtar

      You are cringe. You are smelly.

      You are worthless and very Jelly!

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      >Coincidence that Kaaba (cube) + Allah (god) forms into Kabbalah (cube-god)?
      Black Israelite tier nonsense. Kabbalah comes from qibbel, to receive. And Allah comes from al + illa, The God. Completely different etymologies and the fact that they sound similar to English speakers over a millennia is meaningless.

      Revelation says the New Jerusalem is a golden cube btw, it was never an evil symbol in Christianity. Nor for the Greeks, who you'd think would've called it saturnian if it was. The Pythagoreans said it represented eternity.

  13. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Belief is mind also. There is only consciousness in this world and experience of it.

    Be more responsible and serious about Hindu/buddhist spirituality. Meditate, fast and do self inquiry.

    If you are believing in something instead of directly experiencing it you didn't found the truth. You are still in a dark cave.

  14. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Also I am a painter, and I am really interested into mistisizm, I was planning on living 2 years without seeing a face in total isolation, unfortunately I can't because of personal reasons.
    Mistisizm is use by some to get closer to god, by others it's a way to try to feed the soul without god.
    But i look in to it for "abilities" that comes by strengthening the "soul".
    You should learn about it, maybe there you will find what you look for in magic.
    Also don't get in to it , but if you will try to deal with jins do it the islamic way. Don't learn to do it from magicians but form religious people and islamic sources.
    Read the Qur'an and the hadis.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      the church wrote the Qur'an

  15. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Genuinely looking forward to the day when my tax dollars can finally take care of the primary sources of you folks.

  16. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Bruh, Islamic wizards are just devout Muslims. You haven't heard all the tales of deeply pious Muslims performing miracles and shit. What else do you want?

  17. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Hehehehe. Go to the Fire Temples of the Zoroastrians. There you shall find your ancient birth right. Beware. The path is treacherous and many paths abound.

  18. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Study the Hermetica. It is the real stuff my brother of another culture. Us westerners either in Christian Europe or the ummah who want to explore the true limits of our reality start by studying Hermeticism. From that point on there is magic and hermetic qaballah. You will be a wizard. Read the corpus Hermeticum and Pymander, emerald tablets of Thoth, Asclepius, Sefer Raziel HaMalakh, shams al ma’arif. From there expand and learn as much as you can. I know you will learn much. I believe in you brother.

  19. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    I've seen some based quotes from Jalal ad-Din Rumi, it says he was a poet, scholar etc but also a Sufi mystic.

  20. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Allah, the Quran and Sunnah are the only teachers. Those who look for guidance beyond these will be led astray.
    Allah has perfected Islam, any innovation only brings flaws and destruction upon your soul.

  21. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    Just do it, anon. I have been a magician larping as a Catholic for years. You can always drop the facade if it becomes wise to do so later. Much of the magical literature of the West came down to us through your culture.

  22. 2 months ago
    Typical Allah Worshipper

    >Human beings

    You have a right to choose , funny you should say all that .

    Being a wizard does not exempt you from obligatory prayers or fasting.

    Also real wizards acknowledge the existence of the divine even if they do not follow particular cultural practices , follow divine houses or have a word for it.

    This is because magic is beyond the profane.

    If you really feel it , travel to another country. Pretending to be a wizard to convince yourself that you don't believe in something is childish.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Life is holy

  23. 2 months ago
    Anonymous

    First, you must summon a jinn to do your bidding. No self-respecting Islamic magus does anything magical by himself, that's double haram.

    • 2 months ago
      Anonymous

      Jinns pretend to be people's ancestors to gain power and influence over them

      >Forced to drink urine
      >Test every spirit if things are unclear

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