How did the ancients know about robots?

How did the ancients know about robots?
According to Greek mythology Hephaestus crafted fully autonomous robots, both for utility and war, he even made robo-waifus who had "understanding in their hearts, and speech and strength".
How the frick did they imagine this is a possibility?

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  1. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Some wine drunk story teller 2500 years ago
    >bro what if there was armor that walked around on its own
    Some moron 2500 years later
    >THE GREEKS HAD ROBOTS!!!

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Read the stories, Hephaestus was a giant who built robotic limbs and animals. Giants also appear in Irish mythology along with a fairy king called Nuada who had a metal (robotic) arm.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      And the moron was right.
      The past is full of robots and airships.
      They also had hydraulics and electricity.
      The dwarves (kabeiroi) had a underground railway system.
      It is this BECAUSE I SAID SO.
      Feels so good to be God.
      Feels so good to be a moron.

  2. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >Robots
    Lmao, they are brought to life with their telekinesis

  3. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Most ideas are prehistoric. Greeks were smarter than most of your elons today or any average man. Only natural they'd find their calling building robo waifus

  4. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    cuz we're all robots homie

  5. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Are french fries paranormal?

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      only when frozen and fried twice

  6. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Obviously because they had them, and likely still do. Hephaestus also had little R2D2 robots they described as “tripods on wheels” that would zip around and do chores in his workshop.

    I like to imagine the robo-waifus that carried him around on a throne had like cartoonishly large knockers

  7. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They had a tradition of making "robots" or rather automatons

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automaton

    https://theses.gla.ac.uk/76774/7/2019GrilloPhD.pdf

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Daedalus was, according to some, part of the Metionids clan, who sprung from the bizarre chthonic union of Hephaestus and Athena.

  8. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Greek myths were old long before the Ancient Greeks started telling them. No one knows where the original stories came from. Oddly enough there are Irish folk tales with very similar themes (the Cyclops, cauldrons that allow warriors to grow limbs back so they can return to battle), so there is a possible Irish origin to some of these stories, or something that predates even Ancient Irish civilisation and inspired both cultures.

  9. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >How did the ancients know about robots?
    >According to Greek mythology Hephaestus crafted fully autonomous robots,

    Lower realms which act from hunger/compulsion and require a 'host' (or robot) to act agentically. Titans bound in Tartarus, then 'spirits of the air'.

  10. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Cthonic deities havepower to weild matter through alchemical consistency to adhere to thermodynamic law through manifesting technology purely on thought. See heat engines and computers, they even e ist in the shadow world, a special relativistic world only accessible through phantom. It's essentially a clone of this world but with the benefits of Magick and flight. A Dream world of sorts. The idea is thermodyanmically there is a similar world that is antithetical due to spatial relativistic effects on the other side of the sun and moon.

  11. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Every single one of you missed The Anglo Saxons in your literature analysis'.

  12. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The ancients were more advanced than most people think. Not in the sense of muh spaceships or ancient alien jargon, in the sense that they were almost on the breakthrough of industrial revolution and if they hadn't all the slaves they had at their disposal it would have probably happened.

  13. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Control release tokens...
    Add turn style...
    Insert token...
    Count tokens...
    Take the variables...

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >Add in satanism and it all turns into...
      Blood money

  14. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Hellenes had steam engines.
    In mainstream history views, it's generally accepted that they only really used steam for little tricks and toys and didn't know that if you could make the hot cloud move a doll around you could probably make the hot cloud move a cart.
    Historians of course have regularly been exposed as shortsighted, narrowminded, uncreative dumdums.
    They didn't reckon the Romans knew of steam, and still reckon this despite the fact there's documentation of a steam-powered carriage.
    Plus, what would Romans need those colossal roads for? The hard surface is bad on the feet and knees of soldiers, which is a fact historians don't even think of.
    But steam-powered carriages could use the flat-paved roads quite well.
    And that's without considering the other document which describes a mechanism using steam to replace oxen on a Mediterranean barge. Roman paddle wheel steamboats.

    So no, they definitely knew of robots and probably had a good idea about how to make them work.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      A toe-first gait is much more manageable on hard surfaces. More muscle to cushion the landing. It's a pet theory of mine, especially since Romulus and Remus were said to be raised by wolves.

    • 4 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      There was a roman bath which was excavated and had a steam system built into it. It is no secret.

    • 4 weeks ago
      DoctorGreen

      >The Hellenes had steam engines.
      >In mainstream history views, it's generally accepted that they only really used steam for little tricks and toys and didn't know that if you could make the hot cloud move a doll around you could probably make the hot cloud move a cart.
      >Historians of course have regularly been exposed as shortsighted, narrowminded, uncreative dumdums.
      >They didn't reckon the Romans knew of steam, and still reckon this despite the fact there's documentation of a steam-powered carriage.
      >Plus, what would Romans need those colossal roads for? The hard surface is bad on the feet and knees of soldiers, which is a fact historians don't even think of.
      >But steam-powered carriages could use the flat-paved roads quite well.
      >And that's without considering the other document which describes a mechanism using steam to replace oxen on a Mediterranean barge. Roman paddle wheel steamboats.
      >So no, they definitely knew of robots and probably had a good idea about how to make them work.

      There was a roman bath which was excavated and had a steam system built into it. It is no secret.

      >There was a roman bath which was excavated and had a steam system built into it. It is no secret.
      interesting
      maybe useful

  15. 4 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    bruh they had actual automatons, it’s not hard to imagine cyborgs and robots after that

  16. 4 weeks ago
    DoctorGreen

    >How did the ancients know about robots?
    Because They had robots, duh

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