How come most "neopagans" worship the Greek/Norse pantheons? Why are Kemetics so rare comparatively?

How come most "neopagans" worship the Greek/Norse pantheons? Why are Kemetics so rare comparatively? What about Mesopotamian Gods? It's bothersome, really.

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  1. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    because the metapagans are more pagan than the pagans and deep down all they know is do what head monke do, which is jerk off to a palm tree
    Black person

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      What? What are you talking about. This is highly irrelevant.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        relevancy is not a matter of gradation, you are looking to confirm biases

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Not OP, but aren't we all begging the question to confirm existing biases? I rarely see threads on here where people seem to genuinely want to convert to another school of thought.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            lurk moar

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I've been posting here since before election tourists stank it up.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            that's an oof from me pal

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Maybe I'm just drawn to these kinds of threads.
            Anyway OP, I assume from the language you're using that you're a kemetic. Why does the (perceived) overabundance of Norse neopagans bother you?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >Why does the (perceived) overabundance of Norse neopagans bother you?
            not op but it just screams internet is a white devil calling card, all numbers considered

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Because I'm greedy and I want more people like me around.
            Also they always seem like they're thinking something sinister about non-white races.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Round of applause for you !

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Pardon my moronation but what is a metapagan?

  2. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because the larpagans are normally Northern Europeans or their American descendants. Don’t you know that the lowercase “gods” are ancestor spirits? They live in your epigenetic memory. Obviously a Swede who calls upon the ancestor spirits should expect a white dude to show up, not some hook nose squinty eyed desert dweller

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      I suppose most of my experience has been with Americans who take up the pagan title. Which annoys me greatly because the Egyptian Gods are Cooler and Better than the Greek/Norse guys. Are they stupid?

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >why don't people pick their gods/religion like sports teams or television channels?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Really, why not? Older myths are way more cool

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Not everyone traces their lineage of civilization back to Egypt. Not everyone traces the lives of their souls through Egypt.
        If you aren't part of the tonal of Egypt then its gods and spirits won't seem as meaningful to you.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          Out of curiosity, can you elaborate on the "lives of their souls" part?

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            The soul lives its own parallel existence to itself in each reality throughout all time, so each moment of the past can be seen. There is a progression of the soul through both geography and temporal perception of existence, and it views itself as being something during its past that has always been changing into what it is now. But the Egyptian culture was just one branch, rather than the trunk, through which all moments of the past converges with the present.

            Souls aren't all going through the same linear progression of history from past to present. The 'outside' of earth time is as much the future as it is the past, and that future itself isn't simply the linear progression of our own future, but is the temporal path of lives and experiences from many worlds converging into one being. So if one is 'egyptian', then the question becomes what is 'egyptian', and that relies on the notion of the absence of being egyptian which is that which came before that period of civilization existed.
            So you can just keep going further back until you preexist any established spiritual or religious traditions. If your memory is older than the gods than they aren't gods to you they are just beings who walked the path quicker and reached their culmination earlier in history.

  3. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    A lot of neopagan movements are backlashes against the fact that European countries are all Christianized and attempts to reclaim perceived "authentic" national character ("the old ways"). This sort of rhetoric is massively appealing to huwhites from European countries (or americans who claim affinity to their "european heritage") for obvious reasons.
    By contrast, there isn't nearly as much of a cultural desire to return to old faiths among arabic cultural groups. Most backlash against modern trends manifests in secular democratic movements (Arab Spring), or Islamic fundamentalist revolutions like in Iran. Worship of Egyptian gods is thus relegated largely to westerners admiring the aesthetic, and with the mesopotamian gods, you're more likely to see a larger revival of Zoroastrianism, frankly.
    >tl;dr: neonazis and other nationalist euro movements want to retvrn, arab nations either don't want to retvrn (secular movements) or want to retvrn to fundie islam

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >By contrast, there isn't nearly as much of a cultural desire to return to old faiths among arabic cultural groups
      I’ve met Arab Neopagan stone-worshippers

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        They absolutely exist, but they're much more niche.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        these must have been westernized arabs, you dont get pagans in muslim societies because they have sufis

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Sufism isn't an IQ barrier into atheism

  4. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Polytheism is cool and to be fair you could follow deities of each pantheon. After all, Alexander prayed to a few Egyptian deities. Isis got a following in Rome, etc

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      and were ever free to pray to the christian god, and many did and finally preferred to pray to him only. the christianization of the roman empire was not the wholesale destruction of tradition that neopagan polemicists usually allege. many old traditions (which were far more than just the worship of the gods) were integrated into the new cult, and still others continued side by side with the church unbothered by it until the modern age. neopaganism is an exclusively modern phenomenon because it seeks to address an exclusively modern form of repression.

  5. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I think it's just because its easier to read about them.
    How many people do you know that can read Egyptian or Sumerian?

    • 3 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      More people should learn Sumerian, everything you could possibly need is now online, it’s much easier now than even just ten or twenty years ago
      𒌑𒈪𒀀 𒀝 𒅗 𒍪 𒅴𒂠𒂠
      u2-mia-a ak dug4 zu eme-gi-š
      “The people [should] proceed to learn to speak Eme-gir”

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I've actually thought about it. I'm trying to learn two languages at once already though so I don't want to fry my brain any harder than I already am. But it was a strong contender for something to do after I become relatively fluent in those.

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The advice I got when I started was “Don’t start with Sumerian! First you have to learn Akkadian, and to learn that you need French and German and maybe Arabic” which in retrospect wasn’t the best advice, Akkadian isn’t actually super useful for Sumerian, it’s more the other way around. I think Akkadian is just more popular because it’s better understood (and aside from linguistics, the later corpus is more culturally relatable than some of the earlier material, which probably has a lot to do with it it)
          Anyways, if I were starting aftesh today I’d pick between Foxvog’s “Introduction to Sumerian Grammar” and Zolyomi’s “An Introduction to the Grammar of Sumerian”, both available online, and work through that
          You can also practice with texts from the ETCSL and Electronic Pennsylvania Sumerian Dictionary to build up your sign vocabulary

          It probably is easier to learn the basic sign forms through Akkadian first because there’s more widely-available intro material, but you can learn all that and still have a long ways to go before actually understanding Sumerian, because the sign inventory became smaller and simpler over time as a rule. And Akkadian being a Semitic language only has so much in common with Sumerian other than the basic signs and borrowed logograms

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            learning Aramaic and Hebrew would help you get to Akkadian way better than Arabic & French. But all the good philology on these dead languages was done in Italian, Polish, and German. Perhaps you just gotta learn 'em all.

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            Aramaic, sure. Hebrew and Arabic I’d say are pretty much of equal value, but from what I gather, Imperial Aramaic is quite close to Neo-Assyrian Akkadian, and in fact Aramaic was probably more widely-spoken in Assyria than Akkadian was.
            Even so, you come across Arabic and Hebrew cognates to Akkadian words with surprising frequency.
            And yeah German especially is the most unavoidable if you want to get deep into it, for Sumerian

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        I like the writing system and base 60 is neat.

      • 3 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Seen a guy on tiktok also use numbers on transliteration. When i asked him what a 3 meant, he said its an equivalent of aleph. So, what are 2s and 4s?

        • 3 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          The numbers indicate variants sign readings or homonyms:
          for instance: a1 designates 𒀀 - “water, semen, offspring”
          a2 is 𒀉 - “time” or “labor” (derived from a pictogram “arm” - so it came to be “time” in the sense of “a day’s wage”)

          These are different signs with different meanings, but iirc they’re both read phonetically as EerieWeb in Akkadian transliteration so they were assigned the same transcription value and are distinguished by the number for convenience.
          Originally, the numerals were supposed to be an index of frequency, so the most commonly read variant would be a1, the 2nd most common is a2, etc. These days it’s mostly just convention.
          There are tons of variants in some cases, but most are relatively rare so while you could read 𒌋 as a6, a6 is so rare that you’d normally assume that’s u1 instead - same sign, different reading - 𒌋, a6, u1
          Likewise, a5 - 𒀝 a rare variant with the same sign as “ak” 𒀝

          Another good example is GU:
          gu1 𒄖 “string”
          𒄘 gu2 “neck, river bank”
          𒅗 gu3 = KA “voice, noise”
          𒄞 gu4 = GUD “ox”
          𒅥 gu7 = KAxGAR “eat”

          On that last you, you see two signs multiplied, KA times GAR - that’s 𒅗 combined with 𒃻
          GAR is “pile”, so the sign for eat is like “mouth-pile” - 𒅥

          • 3 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            By the way, we know most of these signs from bilingual sign lists, which show the Sumerian sign and its definition in Akkadian, spelled out phonetically.
            So we know Sumerian GAR means “pile” and was pronounced roughly like /gar/ because we have its Akkadian translation, “garānu” - 𒂷 𒊏 𒉡
            Akkadian speakers adapted Cuneiform into a syllabic system, so Akkadian is simpler to read than Sumerian and its words usually have recognizable cognates in other Semitic languages.

            That’s another reason people sometimes recommend Akkadian first, since it’s how Sumerian was deciphered.

  6. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    They probably don't even believe in them they just think they are cool probably lol.

  7. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The functioning of Egyptian cosmology and their pantheon is more distant and alien culturally than the functioning of Greek or Norse. Most neopagans are either European or North American, and therefore have a European cultural framework to work from. Because of this, Norse and Greek mythology is more familiar to them. Most Western people know *something* about Greek mythology, for instance, even if they largely regard it as pure myth. People from Egypt/from North African countries who adopted such a form of worship would be also unlikely to talk in the same online spaces as Europeans/North Americans, and therefore will always be more rare.

    I will say that a not insignificant amount of neopagans are eclectics who take practices and deities from more or less whatever source they find interesting. There is undoubtedly people out there worshipping Ra etc. alongside whatever other deities they've happened upon, which is in itself not something that would be too weird to the Greeks or Romans (Dionysus is usually considered to have originally come from outside Greece, the Roman Mithras cult worshipped a deity from originally, I believe, Persia..). By the time of Rome having an empire that stretched across Europe (and at this time North Africa was included within this and within what concept of Europe that would have been held) local deities were usually equated with Roman ones and a not insignificant amount of Romans would have considered it to basically be the same deities even with differing names and mythologies - and in many ways they were right, many of these European and North African pantheons having originally derived from the PIE pantheon of gods.

  8. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Partly because the last few years of e-paganism has a had a "muh lily-white Aryan roots" element to it.
    Partly because those mythologies are thought of as relatively familiar and accessible.
    Partly because modern spirituality is still mindbroken by the western Axial Age notion of needing to have a single, consistent explanation or narrative for things to the exclusion of alternatives, not many people are even aware of that as opt-in programming or would see a point to jailbreaking it if they were, and Mesopotamian and (even more so) Egyptian mythology become giant indecipherable messes if you make any intellectually honest effort to understand them on those terms.

  9. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    >What about Mesopotamian Gods?
    I’ve known some pagans who worship them but broadly the lack of temples is a huge impediment, the religion was heavily institutionalized
    might be the issue with Kemet too: egyptian religious practices were entirely tied up in a way of life and cultural practice that is mostly no longer present

    Greek and Norse NeoPaganism also have the advantage that the main body of interpretation about their beliefs postdate the Christian era and thus were retroactively systematized in an easily-digestible pop-culture format

  10. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    The Church of the Eternal Source.

  11. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    I primarily follow a European goddess, but I also worship Bastet, an Egyptian goddess. This was not planned, she came to me. Granted, I live in an area with a lot of Egyptian symbolism (Memphis), so that might have something to do with it.
    Protip:
    If gods don’t come to you on their own or immediate reciprocate you’re likely perceived of as more of a pest than a worshipper.

  12. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Because Egypt was the most "academicized" (read: turned souless) of these ancient civs. This was helped by the desert landscape, and the fact that every ruin is treated as either a tomb or a temple.
    Actually Egypt was part of Atlantis, and the entirety of North Africa was green, with dozens of rivers. The sands on sahara aren't the standard of desers around the world, they are typical of ocean floors. That area was once covered by water, with chains of islands on it. Earth's poleshift caused the water to tilt, which flooded other parts of the world, while removing water from there.

  13. 3 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Becausr most pagan ‘movements’ are just larps started by the catholic church to keep people from looking into the sumerians. Rome only came to power by seeking out and killing all the sumerian remnants, so naturally they dont want to see a revival!! Hail mary.

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