esotericism and minimalism

is there any relationship between minimalist design and esoteric sciences or esoteric knowledge?
is there any esoteric doctrine or esoteric current that is related to minimalism and minimalist design?

whether it be art, architecture, minimalist figures or minimalist symbols

the closest thing i find to an esoteric doctrine with minimalism as part of its philosophy is Japanese Zen or buddhism although to be honest i still don't understand the inner meaning of minimalism in Buddhist doctrine and japanese Zen doctrine

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  1. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    its minimally esoteric

  2. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    It's a good way to detect and avoid unwanted entities fricking with you.
    Spirits and such latch onto objects, patterns and symbols. If the layout and contents of your house are minimalist and lacking in any pattern outside the most simplistic geometric ones than it is significantly harder for them to stick around or "haunt" it.
    That said it would also be significantly less appealing to deities that you might WANT to show up.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      interesting

      Do you have any idea or theory as to why minimalism is so present in Zen Buddhism and Japanese aesthetics?

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Their practices invite contact with spirit entities. Quite openly, in Shinto. It makes sense that they’d want to minimize the chances for unwanted hauntings, if the other anon’s theory is correct, compelling as it is. They open doors to the other side daily in hopes of getting something out of it. They know that uninvited guests freely use those same open doors. If those trespassers have nothing to latch onto, or nothing they desire about the space to make it worth staying, then they’ll simply move on and become someone else’s problem.

        Have you never watched Inuyasha?

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          >Have you never watched Inuyasha?

          That's interesting, can you recommend more anime or manga series in which an esoteric and symbolic meaning can be perceived in the minimalist design and minimalist aesthetics?

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            I believe he was referencing Inuyasha because it related to shintoism more than minimalism.
            That said I think Mushishi has some interesting shit on that.

            Once again though, the symbolic meaning in minimalism is more than likely a lack of meaning rather than any specific meaning.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Japanese I would assume copied it like they did most of their culture, unless you're talking about native Japanese like the Ainu in which case I have no idea.
        Zen Buddhism I feel has a pretty logical connection to minimalism, they seek to separate themselves from individual identity and desire, therefore a minimalist aesthetic makes sense to me.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Empty rooms can feel incredibly haunted. Please explain that.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        Depends what happened in the room.
        If someone gets murdered then there's still a good chance the room is haunted.
        It's also highly possible it's just the person in the room that's actually being haunted.

        • 2 weeks ago
          Anonymous

          I don't understand how this fits with your idea about objects being anchors for entities to latch onto.
          There must be a different explanation.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            >I don't understand how this fits with your idea about objects being anchors for entities to latch onto.
            They're A form of anchor not THE only form of anchor. There's not one single unifying system by which these things operate, there's many.
            An empty room with tons of history is easier to latch onto than an empty room that was built 5 years ago.
            And also like I said the people can be latched onto separately from objects or places, but the spirits latched onto them may only manifest in certain areas.

          • 2 weeks ago
            Anonymous

            but minimalism has nothing to do with the age of the house/structure

  3. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Look at this, why did the Japanese have a certain obsession with minimalism since ancient times?

  4. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous
  5. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    why?

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why are you so perplexed by this architecture? It looks nice and is extremely simple to design.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        >Why are you so perplexed by this architecture?

        because the only ones who have this aesthetic and minimalist design are the japanese, but the chinese and koreans are not even close to this type of art even though Japan is historically and culturally very close to China and Korea

        only the japanese knew how to do it and create this aesthetic, the only ones of all asian peoples

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      Why are you so perplexed by this architecture? It looks nice and is extremely simple to design.

      OP I don’t think this is the place to get what you’re looking for. Minimalism invites minimal exposition. I suggest finding a professor who has written a doctorate on minimalism, and send him an email or give him a call.

      • 2 weeks ago
        Anonymous

        well, yes, i will keep it in mind

  6. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    any theory?

  7. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    Less stuff, more life.
    Less stuff, easier to clean.
    Living in a clean space, more beauty.

  8. 2 weeks ago
    Anonymous

    In a Japanese context, no. Zen Buddhism is not the esoteric form, that's Shingon/Tendai and their aesthetics are not minimalist.

    • 2 weeks ago
      Anonymous

      >In a Japanese context, no. Zen Buddhism is not the esoteric form, that's Shingon/Tendai and their aesthetics are not minimalist.

      okay, it seems that you know some about japanese religion and history

      i have an important question for you: what elements and concepts can be considered minimalist within the historical culture and religion of Japan and Japanese society?

      as i said, Japanese Zen Buddhism seems to be a very minimalist concept that inspired a lot of minimalism in the art, architecture and culture of Japan, i am looking for more similar concepts and ideas that are compatible with minimalism within Japan

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